The Power of Entrepreneurship

Business Environment, Innovation & Entrepreneurship
MBA-515-21393
Module 2: The Power of Entrepreneurship
Bruce Crochetiere

Module 1: Introductions
Attendance
Assignment 1: Recap
The Power of Entrepreneurship
Assignment 2
Building your Business Plan
January 28 Class Guest APA Instructor

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
The Power of Entrepreneurship
Just from $13/Page
Order Essay

Assignment 1: Recap
Your Attributes (Start thinking about your business)
The Four Agreements by Don Miguel Ruiz
Be Impeccable with your Word
Don’t Take Anything Personally
Don’t Make Assumptions
Always Do your Best

The Power of Entrepreneurship
In 2018 there where 30.2 million small businesses in the US 99.9% of all U.S. Businesses
Small Business is defined as 500 or fewer employees
Small Business employees 58.9 million which is 47.5 of all U.S. employees
Small business exporters 287,835 in 2018
Creative Destruction “process of industrial mutation that incessantly revolutionizes the economic structure from within, incessantly destroying the old one, incessantly creating a new one”.

Technology Transforms our lives
Intel (Microprocessor, 1968) and Microsoft (MS-DOS, 1980) are the two major entrepreneurial driving forces in the information technology revolution
VisiCalc spreadsheet (1979)
IBM PC (1981), Apple Macintosh (1984)
Development of the Internet www (1991)
Mosaic first browser (1995)
Amazon, Apple (iPhone), Facebook, and Goggle

Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) Companies
(30 largest companies listed on stock exchanges in the United States )
1896 1928 2019 Industry Date Added
American Cotton Oil Allied Can 3M Conglomerate 8/9/1976
American Sugar Allied Chemical American Express Financial services 8/30/1982
American Tobacco American Smelting & Refining Apple Inc. Information technology 3/19/2015
Chicago Gas American Sugar Boeing Aerospace manufacturer and Arms industry 3/12/1987
Distilling & Cattle Feeding American Tobacco Caterpillar Inc. Construction and Mining 5/6/1991
General Electric Atlantic Refining Chevron Corporation Petroleum industry 2/19/2008
Laclede Gas Light Bethlehem Steel Cisco Systems Information technology 6/8/2009
National Lead Chrysler The Coca-Cola Company Food industry 3/12/1987
North American General Electric Dow Inc. Chemical industry 4/2/2019
Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad General Motors ExxonMobil Petroleum industry 10/1/1928
U.S. Leather General Railway Goldman Sachs Financial services 9/20/2013
U.S. Rubber Goodrich The Home Depot Retailing 11/1/1999
International Harvester IBM Information technology 6/29/1979
International Nickel Intel Information technology 11/1/1999
Mack Trucks Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical industry 3/17/1997
Nash Motors JPMorgan Chase Financial services 5/6/1991
North American McDonald’s Food industry 10/30/1985
Paramount Publix Merck & Co. Pharmaceutical industry 6/29/1979
Postum Microsoft Information technology 11/1/1999
Radio Corporation Nike Apparel 9/20/2013
Sears, Roebuck Pfizer Pharmaceutical industry 4/8/2004
Standard Oil (NJ) Procter & Gamble Fast moving consumer goods 5/26/1932
Texas Corporation The Travelers Companies Financial services 6/8/2009
Texas Gulf Machines UnitedHealth Group Managed health care 9/24/2012
Union Carbide United Technologies Conglomerate 3/14/1939
U.S. Steal Verizon Telecommunication 4/8/2004
Victor Talking Machines Visa Inc. Financial services 9/20/2013
Westinghouse Walmart Retailing 3/17/1997
Woolworth Walgreens Boots Alliance Retailing 6/26/2018
Wright The Walt Disney Company Broadcasting and entertainment 5/6/1991

MightyWell: Case Study

Emily Levy: Transforming the Patient Experience Through Wearable Wellness

Assignment 2: Due January 27
What do you think will be the next major innovation that changes the way we live, work, and play? Search the Web to identify trends, statistics, and other evidence to support your insight (Venture capitalists in the US have the knack for spotting emergent industries)
MightyWell: What was Emily Levy’s motivation to start a company what were her roadblocks and opportunities
Title page, 1-2 pages, and citations with references.

Building your Business Plan – Final Paper

Executive summary

Company description

Market analysis

Organization structure

Description of the service or product line

Overview of your marketing strategy

Financial projections

Funding your business

Summary

Appendix that includes relevant articles, resumes, or permits.

Filling out an application for establishing a NH Corporation

Case

<

/

p>MightyWell1

https://www

.

businessinnovationfactory.com/video/emily

levy

transforming

the

patient

experience

through

wearable

wellness

/. 

Introduction

As Emily Levy began to settle into her seat on a crowded train from Penn Station to Boston, a four

plus

hour commute that was now becoming a frequent event, she began to think of how far the company

she had founded two

years earlier had come. Graduating from college just months earlier in May 2016,

Emily now found herself with a substantial investment offer that would allow her to grow her company,

but she knew the next 12 months would be challenging. Emily had successfu

lly developed and brought

to market a product focused on improving the health

care experience for patients. She now wondered

whether her company could rely on one product or whether she could disrupt a broader market within

wellness wear.2 Emily knew the d

ecision she was about to make would have significant implications for

the future success and sustainability of her company.

Early Years

To say that Emily Levy was born into a family of fashion industry entrepreneurs would be an

understatement. While Emil

y was growing up, Emily’s mother established a successful career in fashion,

having helped open and run a Giorgio Armani store in the heart of Boston, Massachusetts, before

transitioning into advertising roles at Hill Holiday, a leading advertising firm. W

hile her mother focused

on high

end fashion, Emily’s father targeted more casual customers with his retail clothing store selling

apparel to surfing, skateboarding, and snowboarding enthusiasts. Emily’s brother, 12 years her senior,

followed in the family’

s footsteps. After graduating from college, he launched his own sales

representative company, “GL Sales,” selling on behalf of O’Neill and other apparel companies. All three

ventures provided Emily with direct insight and exposure to product design, manufa

cturing, wholesale

and retail sales. Starting in the eighth grade, Emily balanced time at her father’s store with her

schoolwork, while also working with her brother to organize product samples for him on the weekends.

Unfortunately, the recession of 2000

significantly affected her father’s store, leading to bankruptcy.

Emily recalled “seeing first

hand what being an entrepreneur was and how unforeseen macro risks can

impact a company.”3

In high school, Emily participated in three sports, including serving

as captain for both field hockey and

lacrosse, and completed a number of AP classes, including psychology. Emily had always been interested

in humanities and the human element of history. While school never came easy to her, she took pride in

her work ethi

c and never backed down from challenges. After graduating from high school, Emily

considered a number of undergraduate business programs before accepting a four

year scholarship to

Babson College as a Center for Women’s Entrepreneurial Leadership (CWEL) sc

holar. The mission of

CWEL is to “create a gender

enlightened business ecosystem where a diverse range of entrepreneurial

leaders is encouraged to create economic and social value for themselves, their organizations, and

society.”4 The Center provides fema

le students with an opportunity to further develop and build

confidence in their leadership skill. Knowing that she wanted to start her own business eventually, Emily

believed Babson’s focus on women entrepreneurs would help her accomplish her dream. It was at Babson that Emily began to surround herself with a number of mentors who worked at the Center, often reaching out to them for feedback and advice.

Following her freshman year of college, Emily’s focus on social entrepreneurship continued to grow as she took part in a three‐week program that sent female students to Rwanda to teach entrepreneurship. In 2010, Babson had partnered with the Rwanda Private Sector Federation to establish the Babson Rwanda Entrepreneurship Center (BREC) with the mission of strengthening Rwanda’s entrepreneurial environment:

BREC will partner with Babson’s Center for Women’s Leadership Program to send a team of 5–8 of Babson’s Women’s Leaders from across campus to Save, Rwanda for three weeks in the Summer of 2013 for the second year in a row to teach entrepreneurship, leadership and academic skills to 9th and 10th grade Rwandan students, conduct a women’s leadership seminar at the National University of Rwanda, work alongside aspiring and successful female entrepreneurs of Rwanda, and engage with women empowerment organizations all while getting the opportunity to explore the nation’s capital of Kigali and other unique Rwandan experiences.5

Reflecting on her time in Rwanda, Emily recalled her participation in this program and the unique timing of this trip, “I loved to see how resilient the people in Rwanda were. They taught me that just because you have a bad situation, it doesn’t mean you can’t have a positive life. I definitely have taken that into my own business and personal philosophy.”6

Between her sophomore and junior years in college, Emily traveled to Israel for a three‐month internship. When she arrived in Israel, it was a time of peace, but that soon changed as Hamas began firing rockets toward Israel, eventually leading to the 2014 Israel–Gaza conflict. Emily recalled:

It was a life changing experience. I was there when there was conflict and remember how I just kept working, even though I had friends who kept going into Gaza after being called into the military. One weekend we were surfing with some friends and the next weekend one of them was injured in the conflict and lost his hearing. Just seeing how they kept on working in the face of adversity made me realize that I could embody this attitude too. It’s something I’ll never forget.7

Diagnosing an Opportunity

In seventh grade, Emily had been bitten by a tick, but there was no physical evidence of the bite; doctors had failed to notice symptoms of common diseases associated with tick bites. Throughout high school, Emily had constantly found herself tired and clumsy, often complaining of body pains. In an effort to diagnose and treat her ailments, Emily had met with physical therapists, psychological therapists, holistic doctors, and even had attempted acupuncture, to no avail. For seven years, Emily had struggled physically and mentally to cope each day with fatigue and pain. Prior to leaving for Rwanda in 2013, Emily had completed additional tests; once she returned home, she learned that she had tested positive for Lyme disease.

Lyme disease is prevalent in the United States. “The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that 300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease in the US every year. That’s 1.5 times the number of women diagnosed with breast cancer, and six times the number of people diagnosed with HIV/AIDS each year in the United States. However, because diagnosing Lyme can be difficult, many people who actually have Lyme may be misdiagnosed with other conditions. Many experts believe the true number of cases is much higher.”8

Treatment for Lyme disease can vary but in severe cases can require intravenous medication delivered directly to a patient’s heart via a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC line). Doctor insert a PICC line, a sterile, flexible catheter, into a vein in the patient’s arm and thread it up to the heart, where it can remain in place for days, months, or years depending on the treatment. While PICC lines prevent patients from undergoing IV injections for each treatment, they leave the patient with an exposed end of the catheter outside of the body. Doctors commonly use PICC lines to deliver nutrients and medication for chemotherapy; PICC lines also allow easy access for drawing blood.

In December of her sophomore year, Emily received her first PICC line, which was scheduled to last for six months. Following the placement of the line, nurses and doctors told Emily to wear a cut‐off sock over her arm if she wanted to cover the entry port, which she tried when returning to campus. During her freshman year, Emily had been involved in numerous clubs on campus and had actively participated in social scenes. With a cut‐off sock added to her fashion wardrobe, everything began to change. Fellow students and friends began inquiring about the sock‐covered PICC line and would often stare at her when she had to administer her treatment in public areas. Emily rapidly saw her extroverted personality become much more introverted. As Emily worked to complete her sophomore year, she began to question whether a cut‐off sock was the best option to cover her PICC line.

Creating a Solution

In the spring of 2014, Emily and fellow Babson student, Yousef Al‐Humaidhi, started to explore options to cover her PICC line. They purchased a number of products that were intended to cover PICC lines, but quickly concluded that they failed to meet Emily’s needs. In many cases, Emily even preferred the cut‐off sock to some of the products they evaluated. This initial product research pushed Emily and Yousef to design their own solution. In the fall of 2014, they created their first prototype, which Emily personally used and tested, prior to Babson’s annual Rocket Pitch event.9 Following the three‐minute pitch of their business concept, Emily received strong positive feedback from a number of attendees who told her that the market needed her prototype and business idea and urged her to continue to move forward. Emily left that day with renewed motivation to bring her PICC line cover to market.

In the spring of 2015, Emily took the prototype with her to attend classes at Babson’s San Francisco campus. Throughout the semester, she continued developing the company by using her product for class projects. Through this experience, fellow Babson student Maria del Mar Gomez Viyella joined Emily and Yousef to further build the venture. Emily was fortunate to have Professor Jim Poss, founder and CEO of Big Belly Solar and WeModifi, as her mentor while on the West Coast, absorbing valuable guidance, insights, and encouragement to “just go” and take action.

While in San Francisco, and subsequently when she returned to Boston after the semester, Emily began to focus on raising seed capital to fund her first manufacturing purchase order of $10,000, which ultimately rose to $16,000. Until now, Emily and Yousef had funded the company with an initial investment of $11,000. The majority of this capital had already been invested in designs and prototype development, so Emily needed to look elsewhere.

Kickstarter—Emily established a 30‐day online Kickstarter campaign with the goal of raising $10,000. The campaign was completed under the company’s former name PICCPerfect. She chose Kickstarter over other crowdfunding platforms for three primary reasons: Kickstarter was a known and recognizable global platform, their campaign fees were comparable to other global fundraising sites, and the site had proven successful for entrepreneurs developing physical consumer products. Prior to launching, she received advice from previous entrepreneurs who attempted to raise their own funding; they recommended that she spend time and resources to create a comprehensive marketing plan for the campaign. This advice was reinforced in conversations with many individuals she spoke with who had failed to complete a Kickstarter campaign successfully and subsequently had faced roadblocks from future investors who quickly took notice of their failed funding attempts. In light of this, Emily invested $2,000 to develop professional marketing materials and videos, with the intent of leveraging these for future marketing purposes. Following Kickstarter’s 30‐day period, Emily’s campaign was oversubscribed and raised $13,200, with both domestic and international donors pledging funds. The final campaign generated net proceeds of $12,188 for her company, with 70% of funds generated from friends and family and the remaining 30% from individuals who wanted to purchase the product for themselves or someone else. After creating and shipping all pledge rewards for donors and deducting the cost of marketing materials, Emily’s profits from the campaign were $9,249 (see Exhibit 1.1 for details).

Business competitions—In addition to funding the company through Kickstarter, Emily entered several business competitions in the Greater Boston area. Between 2015 and 2016, Emily participated in 17 business competitions and won first prize in 15. These competitions provided the company with $225,000 in funding and in‐kind professional services and did not dilute Emily’s ownership or that of her co‐founders (see Exhibit 1.2 for details). While Emily invested significant resources and time away from her business to attend these competitions, she gained increased publicity and guidance from industry peers, successful entrepreneurs, and investors.

Soon thereafter, Emily’s market research uncovered that 2.5–3 million patients in the United States receive PICC lines each year.10 This information, along with feedback she had received from patients, nurses, mentors, and the Kickstarter campaign, led her to realize, “This isn’t just Emily who has this problem, it’s an addressable market of 3 million potential customers.”11

Emily returned to Boston for the summer before her senior year at Babson to participate in Babson’s Summer Venture Program (SVP). Graduate and undergraduate students accepted into this program receive housing, work spaces, and access to advisors over the course of an intensive 10‐week period designed to foster meaningful advances for their ventures. Since launching in 2009, this program has assisted over 150 students in the development of 109 ventures, including companies such as Virool and ThinkLite in 2010 and HigherMe in 2014.12 Subsequent to SVP, HigherMe was accepted into Y Combinator, which invests small amounts into new ventures and runs the (Zacharakis, 11/2019, pp. 33-36)
Zacharakis, A., Bygrave, W. D., Corbett, A. C. (11/2019). Entrepreneurship, 5th Edition [VitalSource Bookshelf version]. Retrieved from vbk://9781119563099
Always check citation for accuracy before use.

Case MightyWell1

https://www.businessinnovationfactory.com/video/emily

levy

transforming

the

patient

experience

through

wearable

wellness
/
.

Introduction

As Emily Levy began to settle into her seat on a crowded train from Penn Station to Boston, a four

plus

hour commute that was now becoming a frequent event, she began to think of how far the company
she had founded two
years earlier had come. Graduating from college just months earlier in May 2016,
Emily now found herself with a substantial investment offer that would allow her to grow her company,
but she knew the next 12 months would be challenging. Emily had successfu
lly developed and brought
to market a product focused on improving the health

care experience for patients. She now wondered
whether her company could rely on one product or whether she could disrupt a broader market within
wellness wear.2 Emily knew the d
ecision she was about to make would have significant implications for
the future success and sustainability of her company.

Early Years

To say that Emily Levy was born into a family of fashion industry entrepreneurs would be an
understatement. While Emil
y was growing up, Emily’s mother established a successful career in fashion,
having helped open and run a Giorgio Armani store in the heart of Boston, Massachusetts, before
transitioning into advertising roles at Hill Holiday, a leading advertising firm. W
hile her mother focused
on high

end fashion, Emily’s father targeted more casual customers with his retail clothing store selling
apparel to surfing, skateboarding, and snowboarding enthusiasts. Emily’s brother, 12 years her senior,
followed in the family’
s footsteps. After graduating from college, he launched his own sales
representative company, “GL Sales,” selling on behalf of O’Neill and other apparel companies. All three
ventures provided Emily with direct insight and exposure to product design, manufa
cturing, wholesale
and retail sales. Starting in the eighth grade, Emily balanced time at her father’s store with her
schoolwork, while also working with her brother to organize product samples for him on the weekends.
Unfortunately, the recession of 2000
significantly affected her father’s store, leading to bankruptcy.
Emily recalled “seeing first

hand what being an entrepreneur was and how unforeseen macro risks can
impact a company.”3

In high school, Emily participated in three sports, including serving
as captain for both field hockey and
lacrosse, and completed a number of AP classes, including psychology. Emily had always been interested
in humanities and the human element of history. While school never came easy to her, she took pride in
her work ethi
c and never backed down from challenges. After graduating from high school, Emily
considered a number of undergraduate business programs before accepting a four

year scholarship to
Babson College as a Center for Women’s Entrepreneurial Leadership (CWEL) sc
holar. The mission of
CWEL is to “create a gender

enlightened business ecosystem where a diverse range of entrepreneurial
leaders is encouraged to create economic and social value for themselves, their organizations, and
society.”4 The Center provides fema
le students with an opportunity to further develop and build
confidence in their leadership skill. Knowing that she wanted to start her own business eventually, Emily

Case MightyWell1

https://www.businessinnovationfactory.com/video/emily-levy-transforming-the-

patient-experience-through-wearable-wellness/.

Introduction

As Emily Levy began to settle into her seat on a crowded train from Penn Station to Boston, a four-plus-

hour commute that was now becoming a frequent event, she began to think of how far the company

she had founded two years earlier had come. Graduating from college just months earlier in May 2016,

Emily now found herself with a substantial investment offer that would allow her to grow her company,

but she knew the next 12 months would be challenging. Emily had successfully developed and brought

to market a product focused on improving the health-care experience for patients. She now wondered

whether her company could rely on one product or whether she could disrupt a broader market within

wellness wear.2 Emily knew the decision she was about to make would have significant implications for

the future success and sustainability of her company.

Early Years

To say that Emily Levy was born into a family of fashion industry entrepreneurs would be an

understatement. While Emily was growing up, Emily’s mother established a successful career in fashion,

having helped open and run a Giorgio Armani store in the heart of Boston, Massachusetts, before

transitioning into advertising roles at Hill Holiday, a leading advertising firm. While her mother focused

on high-end fashion, Emily’s father targeted more casual customers with his retail clothing store selling

apparel to surfing, skateboarding, and snowboarding enthusiasts. Emily’s brother, 12 years her senior,

followed in the family’s footsteps. After graduating from college, he launched his own sales

representative company, “GL Sales,” selling on behalf of O’Neill and other apparel companies. All three

ventures provided Emily with direct insight and exposure to product design, manufacturing, wholesale

and retail sales. Starting in the eighth grade, Emily balanced time at her father’s store with her
schoolwork, while also working with her brother to organize product samples for him on the weekends.

Unfortunately, the recession of 2000 significantly affected her father’s store, leading to bankruptcy.

Emily recalled “seeing first-hand what being an entrepreneur was and how unforeseen macro risks can

impact a company.”3

In high school, Emily participated in three sports, including serving as captain for both field hockey and

lacrosse, and completed a number of AP classes, including psychology. Emily had always been interested
in humanities and the human element of history. While school never came easy to her, she took pride in

her work ethic and never backed down from challenges. After graduating from high school, Emily

considered a number of undergraduate business programs before accepting a four-year scholarship to

Babson College as a Center for Women’s Entrepreneurial Leadership (CWEL) scholar. The mission of

CWEL is to “create a gender-enlightened business ecosystem where a diverse range of entrepreneurial

leaders is encouraged to create economic and social value for themselves, their organizations, and

society.”4 The Center provides female students with an opportunity to further develop and build

confidence in their leadership skill. Knowing that she wanted to start her own business eventually, Emily

Case

<

/

p>MightyWell1

https://www

.

businessinnovationfactory.com/video/emily

levy

transforming

the

patient

experience

through

wearable

wellness

/. 

Introduction

As Emily Levy began to settle into her seat on a crowded train from Penn Station to Boston, a four

plus

hour commute that was now becoming a frequent event, she began to think of how far the company

she had founded two

years earlier had come. Graduating from college just months earlier in May 2016,

Emily now found herself with a substantial investment offer that would allow her to grow her company,

but she knew the next 12 months would be challenging. Emily had successfu

lly developed and brought

to market a product focused on improving the health

care experience for patients. She now wondered

whether her company could rely on one product or whether she could disrupt a broader market within

wellness wear.2 Emily knew the d

ecision she was about to make would have significant implications for

the future success and sustainability of her company.

Early Years

To say that Emily Levy was born into a family of fashion industry entrepreneurs would be an

understatement. While Emil

y was growing up, Emily’s mother established a successful career in fashion,

having helped open and run a Giorgio Armani store in the heart of Boston, Massachusetts, before

transitioning into advertising roles at Hill Holiday, a leading advertising firm. W

hile her mother focused

on high

end fashion, Emily’s father targeted more casual customers with his retail clothing store selling

apparel to surfing, skateboarding, and snowboarding enthusiasts. Emily’s brother, 12 years her senior,

followed in the family’

s footsteps. After graduating from college, he launched his own sales

representative company, “GL Sales,” selling on behalf of O’Neill and other apparel companies. All three

ventures provided Emily with direct insight and exposure to product design, manufa

cturing, wholesale

and retail sales. Starting in the eighth grade, Emily balanced time at her father’s store with her

schoolwork, while also working with her brother to organize product samples for him on the weekends.

Unfortunately, the recession of 2000

significantly affected her father’s store, leading to bankruptcy.

Emily recalled “seeing first

hand what being an entrepreneur was and how unforeseen macro risks can

impact a company.”3

In high school, Emily participated in three sports, including serving

as captain for both field hockey and

lacrosse, and completed a number of AP classes, including psychology. Emily had always been interested

in humanities and the human element of history. While school never came easy to her, she took pride in

her work ethi

c and never backed down from challenges. After graduating from high school, Emily

considered a number of undergraduate business programs before accepting a four

year scholarship to

Babson College as a Center for Women’s Entrepreneurial Leadership (CWEL) sc

holar. The mission of

CWEL is to “create a gender

enlightened business ecosystem where a diverse range of entrepreneurial

leaders is encouraged to create economic and social value for themselves, their organizations, and

society.”4 The Center provides fema

le students with an opportunity to further develop and build

confidence in their leadership skill. Knowing that she wanted to start her own business eventually, Emily

believed Babson’s focus on women entrepreneurs would help her accomplish her dream. It was at Babson that Emily began to surround herself with a number of mentors who worked at the Center, often reaching out to them for feedback and advice.

Following her freshman year of college, Emily’s focus on social entrepreneurship continued to grow as she took part in a three‐week program that sent female students to Rwanda to teach entrepreneurship. In 2010, Babson had partnered with the Rwanda Private Sector Federation to establish the Babson Rwanda Entrepreneurship Center (BREC) with the mission of strengthening Rwanda’s entrepreneurial environment:

BREC will partner with Babson’s Center for Women’s Leadership Program to send a team of 5–8 of Babson’s Women’s Leaders from across campus to Save, Rwanda for three weeks in the Summer of 2013 for the second year in a row to teach entrepreneurship, leadership and academic skills to 9th and 10th grade Rwandan students, conduct a women’s leadership seminar at the National University of Rwanda, work alongside aspiring and successful female entrepreneurs of Rwanda, and engage with women empowerment organizations all while getting the opportunity to explore the nation’s capital of Kigali and other unique Rwandan experiences.5

Reflecting on her time in Rwanda, Emily recalled her participation in this program and the unique timing of this trip, “I loved to see how resilient the people in Rwanda were. They taught me that just because you have a bad situation, it doesn’t mean you can’t have a positive life. I definitely have taken that into my own business and personal philosophy.”6

Between her sophomore and junior years in college, Emily traveled to Israel for a three‐month internship. When she arrived in Israel, it was a time of peace, but that soon changed as Hamas began firing rockets toward Israel, eventually leading to the 2014 Israel–Gaza conflict. Emily recalled:

It was a life changing experience. I was there when there was conflict and remember how I just kept working, even though I had friends who kept going into Gaza after being called into the military. One weekend we were surfing with some friends and the next weekend one of them was injured in the conflict and lost his hearing. Just seeing how they kept on working in the face of adversity made me realize that I could embody this attitude too. It’s something I’ll never forget.7

Diagnosing an Opportunity

In seventh grade, Emily had been bitten by a tick, but there was no physical evidence of the bite; doctors had failed to notice symptoms of common diseases associated with tick bites. Throughout high school, Emily had constantly found herself tired and clumsy, often complaining of body pains. In an effort to diagnose and treat her ailments, Emily had met with physical therapists, psychological therapists, holistic doctors, and even had attempted acupuncture, to no avail. For seven years, Emily had struggled physically and mentally to cope each day with fatigue and pain. Prior to leaving for Rwanda in 2013, Emily had completed additional tests; once she returned home, she learned that she had tested positive for Lyme disease.

Lyme disease is prevalent in the United States. “The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that 300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease in the US every year. That’s 1.5 times the number of women diagnosed with breast cancer, and six times the number of people diagnosed with HIV/AIDS each year in the United States. However, because diagnosing Lyme can be difficult, many people who actually have Lyme may be misdiagnosed with other conditions. Many experts believe the true number of cases is much higher.”8

Treatment for Lyme disease can vary but in severe cases can require intravenous medication delivered directly to a patient’s heart via a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC line). Doctor insert a PICC line, a sterile, flexible catheter, into a vein in the patient’s arm and thread it up to the heart, where it can remain in place for days, months, or years depending on the treatment. While PICC lines prevent patients from undergoing IV injections for each treatment, they leave the patient with an exposed end of the catheter outside of the body. Doctors commonly use PICC lines to deliver nutrients and medication for chemotherapy; PICC lines also allow easy access for drawing blood.

In December of her sophomore year, Emily received her first PICC line, which was scheduled to last for six months. Following the placement of the line, nurses and doctors told Emily to wear a cut‐off sock over her arm if she wanted to cover the entry port, which she tried when returning to campus. During her freshman year, Emily had been involved in numerous clubs on campus and had actively participated in social scenes. With a cut‐off sock added to her fashion wardrobe, everything began to change. Fellow students and friends began inquiring about the sock‐covered PICC line and would often stare at her when she had to administer her treatment in public areas. Emily rapidly saw her extroverted personality become much more introverted. As Emily worked to complete her sophomore year, she began to question whether a cut‐off sock was the best option to cover her PICC line.

Creating a Solution

In the spring of 2014, Emily and fellow Babson student, Yousef Al‐Humaidhi, started to explore options to cover her PICC line. They purchased a number of products that were intended to cover PICC lines, but quickly concluded that they failed to meet Emily’s needs. In many cases, Emily even preferred the cut‐off sock to some of the products they evaluated. This initial product research pushed Emily and Yousef to design their own solution. In the fall of 2014, they created their first prototype, which Emily personally used and tested, prior to Babson’s annual Rocket Pitch event.9 Following the three‐minute pitch of their business concept, Emily received strong positive feedback from a number of attendees who told her that the market needed her prototype and business idea and urged her to continue to move forward. Emily left that day with renewed motivation to bring her PICC line cover to market.

In the spring of 2015, Emily took the prototype with her to attend classes at Babson’s San Francisco campus. Throughout the semester, she continued developing the company by using her product for class projects. Through this experience, fellow Babson student Maria del Mar Gomez Viyella joined Emily and Yousef to further build the venture. Emily was fortunate to have Professor Jim Poss, founder and CEO of Big Belly Solar and WeModifi, as her mentor while on the West Coast, absorbing valuable guidance, insights, and encouragement to “just go” and take action.

While in San Francisco, and subsequently when she returned to Boston after the semester, Emily began to focus on raising seed capital to fund her first manufacturing purchase order of $10,000, which ultimately rose to $16,000. Until now, Emily and Yousef had funded the company with an initial investment of $11,000. The majority of this capital had already been invested in designs and prototype development, so Emily needed to look elsewhere.

Kickstarter—Emily established a 30‐day online Kickstarter campaign with the goal of raising $10,000. The campaign was completed under the company’s former name PICCPerfect. She chose Kickstarter over other crowdfunding platforms for three primary reasons: Kickstarter was a known and recognizable global platform, their campaign fees were comparable to other global fundraising sites, and the site had proven successful for entrepreneurs developing physical consumer products. Prior to launching, she received advice from previous entrepreneurs who attempted to raise their own funding; they recommended that she spend time and resources to create a comprehensive marketing plan for the campaign. This advice was reinforced in conversations with many individuals she spoke with who had failed to complete a Kickstarter campaign successfully and subsequently had faced roadblocks from future investors who quickly took notice of their failed funding attempts. In light of this, Emily invested $2,000 to develop professional marketing materials and videos, with the intent of leveraging these for future marketing purposes. Following Kickstarter’s 30‐day period, Emily’s campaign was oversubscribed and raised $13,200, with both domestic and international donors pledging funds. The final campaign generated net proceeds of $12,188 for her company, with 70% of funds generated from friends and family and the remaining 30% from individuals who wanted to purchase the product for themselves or someone else. After creating and shipping all pledge rewards for donors and deducting the cost of marketing materials, Emily’s profits from the campaign were $9,249 (see Exhibit 1.1 for details).

Business competitions—In addition to funding the company through Kickstarter, Emily entered several business competitions in the Greater Boston area. Between 2015 and 2016, Emily participated in 17 business competitions and won first prize in 15. These competitions provided the company with $225,000 in funding and in‐kind professional services and did not dilute Emily’s ownership or that of her co‐founders (see Exhibit 1.2 for details). While Emily invested significant resources and time away from her business to attend these competitions, she gained increased publicity and guidance from industry peers, successful entrepreneurs, and investors.

Soon thereafter, Emily’s market research uncovered that 2.5–3 million patients in the United States receive PICC lines each year.10 This information, along with feedback she had received from patients, nurses, mentors, and the Kickstarter campaign, led her to realize, “This isn’t just Emily who has this problem, it’s an addressable market of 3 million potential customers.”11

Emily returned to Boston for the summer before her senior year at Babson to participate in Babson’s Summer Venture Program (SVP). Graduate and undergraduate students accepted into this program receive housing, work spaces, and access to advisors over the course of an intensive 10‐week period designed to foster meaningful advances for their ventures. Since launching in 2009, this program has assisted over 150 students in the development of 109 ventures, including companies such as Virool and ThinkLite in 2010 and HigherMe in 2014.12 Subsequent to SVP, HigherMe was accepted into Y Combinator, which invests small amounts into new ventures and runs the (Zacharakis, 11/2019, pp. 33-36)
Zacharakis, A., Bygrave, W. D., Corbett, A. C. (11/2019). Entrepreneurship, 5th Edition [VitalSource Bookshelf version]. Retrieved from vbk://9781119563099
Always check citation for accuracy before use.

Case MightyWell1

https://www.businessinnovationfactory.com/video/emily

levy

transforming

the

patient

experience

through

wearable

wellness
/
.

Introduction

As Emily Levy began to settle into her seat on a crowded train from Penn Station to Boston, a four

plus

hour commute that was now becoming a frequent event, she began to think of how far the company
she had founded two
years earlier had come. Graduating from college just months earlier in May 2016,
Emily now found herself with a substantial investment offer that would allow her to grow her company,
but she knew the next 12 months would be challenging. Emily had successfu
lly developed and brought
to market a product focused on improving the health

care experience for patients. She now wondered
whether her company could rely on one product or whether she could disrupt a broader market within
wellness wear.2 Emily knew the d
ecision she was about to make would have significant implications for
the future success and sustainability of her company.

Early Years

To say that Emily Levy was born into a family of fashion industry entrepreneurs would be an
understatement. While Emil
y was growing up, Emily’s mother established a successful career in fashion,
having helped open and run a Giorgio Armani store in the heart of Boston, Massachusetts, before
transitioning into advertising roles at Hill Holiday, a leading advertising firm. W
hile her mother focused
on high

end fashion, Emily’s father targeted more casual customers with his retail clothing store selling
apparel to surfing, skateboarding, and snowboarding enthusiasts. Emily’s brother, 12 years her senior,
followed in the family’
s footsteps. After graduating from college, he launched his own sales
representative company, “GL Sales,” selling on behalf of O’Neill and other apparel companies. All three
ventures provided Emily with direct insight and exposure to product design, manufa
cturing, wholesale
and retail sales. Starting in the eighth grade, Emily balanced time at her father’s store with her
schoolwork, while also working with her brother to organize product samples for him on the weekends.
Unfortunately, the recession of 2000
significantly affected her father’s store, leading to bankruptcy.
Emily recalled “seeing first

hand what being an entrepreneur was and how unforeseen macro risks can
impact a company.”3

In high school, Emily participated in three sports, including serving
as captain for both field hockey and
lacrosse, and completed a number of AP classes, including psychology. Emily had always been interested
in humanities and the human element of history. While school never came easy to her, she took pride in
her work ethi
c and never backed down from challenges. After graduating from high school, Emily
considered a number of undergraduate business programs before accepting a four

year scholarship to
Babson College as a Center for Women’s Entrepreneurial Leadership (CWEL) sc
holar. The mission of
CWEL is to “create a gender

enlightened business ecosystem where a diverse range of entrepreneurial
leaders is encouraged to create economic and social value for themselves, their organizations, and
society.”4 The Center provides fema
le students with an opportunity to further develop and build
confidence in their leadership skill. Knowing that she wanted to start her own business eventually, Emily

Case MightyWell1

https://www.businessinnovationfactory.com/video/emily-levy-transforming-the-

patient-experience-through-wearable-wellness/.

Introduction

As Emily Levy began to settle into her seat on a crowded train from Penn Station to Boston, a four-plus-

hour commute that was now becoming a frequent event, she began to think of how far the company

she had founded two years earlier had come. Graduating from college just months earlier in May 2016,

Emily now found herself with a substantial investment offer that would allow her to grow her company,

but she knew the next 12 months would be challenging. Emily had successfully developed and brought

to market a product focused on improving the health-care experience for patients. She now wondered

whether her company could rely on one product or whether she could disrupt a broader market within

wellness wear.2 Emily knew the decision she was about to make would have significant implications for

the future success and sustainability of her company.

Early Years

To say that Emily Levy was born into a family of fashion industry entrepreneurs would be an

understatement. While Emily was growing up, Emily’s mother established a successful career in fashion,

having helped open and run a Giorgio Armani store in the heart of Boston, Massachusetts, before

transitioning into advertising roles at Hill Holiday, a leading advertising firm. While her mother focused

on high-end fashion, Emily’s father targeted more casual customers with his retail clothing store selling

apparel to surfing, skateboarding, and snowboarding enthusiasts. Emily’s brother, 12 years her senior,

followed in the family’s footsteps. After graduating from college, he launched his own sales

representative company, “GL Sales,” selling on behalf of O’Neill and other apparel companies. All three

ventures provided Emily with direct insight and exposure to product design, manufacturing, wholesale

and retail sales. Starting in the eighth grade, Emily balanced time at her father’s store with her
schoolwork, while also working with her brother to organize product samples for him on the weekends.

Unfortunately, the recession of 2000 significantly affected her father’s store, leading to bankruptcy.

Emily recalled “seeing first-hand what being an entrepreneur was and how unforeseen macro risks can

impact a company.”3

In high school, Emily participated in three sports, including serving as captain for both field hockey and

lacrosse, and completed a number of AP classes, including psychology. Emily had always been interested
in humanities and the human element of history. While school never came easy to her, she took pride in

her work ethic and never backed down from challenges. After graduating from high school, Emily

considered a number of undergraduate business programs before accepting a four-year scholarship to

Babson College as a Center for Women’s Entrepreneurial Leadership (CWEL) scholar. The mission of

CWEL is to “create a gender-enlightened business ecosystem where a diverse range of entrepreneurial

leaders is encouraged to create economic and social value for themselves, their organizations, and

society.”4 The Center provides female students with an opportunity to further develop and build

confidence in their leadership skill. Knowing that she wanted to start her own business eventually, Emily

Calculator

Calculate the price of your paper

Total price:$26
Our features

We've got everything to become your favourite writing service

Need a better grade?
We've got you covered.

Order your paper