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Enhance Your Emotional Intelligence (EI)

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In the article, “Leadership That Gets Results,” and in your lecture notes, the six styles of leadership are explained. Think about your EI and how it guides your leadership style. Identify the leadership style you think is most appropriate for your business. What secondary style might be complementary?  Which competencies do you want to improve to enhance your EI? Support your answer with information from your DiSC assessment results.

Post your initial response by Wednesday, midnight of your time zone, and reply to at least 2 of your classmates’ initial posts by Sunday, midnight of your time zone

 The Idea in Brief The Idea in Practice COPYRIGHT © 2000 HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL PUBLISHING CORPORATION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Many managers mistakenly assume that leadership style is a function of personality rather than strategic choice. Instead of choosing the one style that suits their temperament, they should ask which style best addresses the demands of a particular situation. Research has shown that the most successful leaders have strengths in the following emotional intelligence competencies: selfawareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skill. There are six basic styles of leadership; each makes use of the key components of emotional intelligence in different combinations. The best leaders don’t know just one style of leadership— they’re skilled at several, and have the flexibility to switch between styles as the circumstances dictate. Managers often fail to appreciate how profoundly the organizational climate can influence financial results. It can account for nearly a third of financial performance. Organizational climate, in turn, is influenced by leadership style—by the way that managers motivate direct reports, gather and use information, make decisions, manage change initiatives, and handle crises. There are six basic leadership styles. Each derives from different emotional intelligence competencies, works best in particular situations, and affects the organizational climate in different ways. 1. The coercive style. This “Do what I say” approach can be very effective in a turnaround situation, a natural disaster, or when working with problem employees. But in most situations, coercive leadership inhibits the organization’s flexibility and dampens employees’ motivation. 2. The authoritative style. An authoritative leader takes a “Come with me” approach: she states the overall goal but gives people the freedom to choose their own means of achieving it. This style works especially well when a business is adrift. It is less effective when the leader is working with a team of experts who are more experienced than he is. 3. The affiliative style. The hallmark of the affiliative leader is a “People come first” attitude. This style is particularly useful for building team harmony or increasing morale. But its exclusive focus on praise can allow poor performance to go uncorrected. Also, affiliative leaders rarely offer advice, which often leaves employees in a quandary. 4. The democratic style. This style’s impact on organizational climate is not as high as you might imagine. By giving workers a voice in decisions, democratic leaders build organizational flexibility and responsibility and help generate fresh ideas. But sometimes the price is endless meetings and confused employees who feel leaderless. 5. The pacesetting style. A leader who sets high performance standards and exemplifies them himself has a very positive impact on employees who are self-motivated and highly competent. But other employees tend to feel overwhelmed by such a leader’s demands for excellence—and to resent his tendency to take over a situation. 6. The coaching style. This style focuses more on personal development than on immediate work-related tasks. It works well when employees are already aware of their weaknesses and want to improve, but not when they are resistant to changing their ways. The more styles a leader has mastered, the better. In particular, being able to switch among the authoritative, affiliative, democratic, and coaching styles as conditions dictate creates the best organizational climate and optimizes business performance 

Respond to this one please

 
Enhance Your Emotional Intelligence (EI)

Having a high emotional intelligence means that one has control over his/her emotions and for those around him/her. By having high emotional intelligence, I can discern my feelings and know how they affect the people around me. In business, leaders that have high emotional intelligence always assess the situation before coming down with stress. According to the article by Goleman (2000), the pacesetting style seems appropriate for my business due to various reasons. First, as a CS, I desire to perform my duties with accuracy and precision. As such, I expect my employees to follow in my footsteps and seek to perform their duties diligently. Secondly, I always believe that leaders should lead by example so that the employees remain self-motivated and competent. This is true according to my DiSC overview since I detest workplaces with emotionally charged environments because employees become uncomfortable when performing their duties. Lastly, as a leader, I believe in providing support whenever my employees are faced with a challenge. As a pacesetter, I believe that I should be a team player by being available and approachable. After setting high-performance standards, a leader should be available for consultations with his team members.

The secondary style that I will use is the democratic style since I like a business where employees are free to voice their concerns and decisions. As a CS, I tend to be diplomatic and considerate of the needs of others. The democratic leadership style enhances creativity and teamwork. Further, it improves honesty as employees find it easy to express their decisions and provide feedback.

I need to work on my perfectionism trait since it can affect my employees negatively. As they struggle to achieve perfection, they may fail to beat deadlines, thus making my company lose on business. I also need to work on my reserved nature since it can make me un-approachable to ideas deemed extreme.

Reference

Goleman, D. (2000). Leadership that gets results. Harvard business review, 78(2), 4-17.

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1 day agoKeena Alexander RE: Week 3 Discussion

COLLAPSE

Demond,

The pacesetting and democratic leadership styles did not initially strike me as aligned with the CS behavioral profile. However, your description showcases how they place value on accuracy and group alignment, respectively. Thank you for opening my perspective. Reading your post, I asked the question, “Who ensures the group reaches the finish line If the leader is setting the pace and then allowing the team to decide their part in the race”? Your observation of teammates failing to meet deadlines seems spot on. What tactics have you considered to help overcome this obstacle?

As a D, it is sometimes difficult for me to appreciate the C persona’s lack of acceptance of risk, but I am always grateful for their thoroughness. I have learned to accept that while we all may a

MG9UBAUAPD

Workplace Profile
Vanessa Woodard
Monday, January 13, 2020

This report is provided by:

The Jack Welch Management Institute

For additional information contact:
Center for Internal Change
(847) 259-0005
support@internalchange.com
www.internalchange.com

VANESSA WOODARD

2
© by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.

Introduction
WHAT IS EVERYTHING DiSC®?

CORNERSTONE PRINCIPLES
Vanessa, have you ever wondered why connecting with
some people is easier for you than with others?

Maybe you’ve noticed that you relate better to
colleagues who focus more on dependability and
stability.

Or, maybe you’re more comfortable working with those
who take a steady, sensible approach than those who
fly by the seat of their pants.

Or, perhaps you relate best to people who are more
supportive than competitive.

Welcome to Everything DiSC Workplace®. The DiSC®
model is a simple tool that’s been helping people to
connect better for over thirty years. This report uses
your individual assessment data to provide a wealth of
information about your workplace priorities and
preferences. In addition, you’ll learn how to connect
better with colleagues whose priorities and preferences
differ from yours.

• All DiSC styles and priorities are equally
valuable and everyone is a blend of all
four styles.

• Your work style is also influenced by other
factors such as life experiences,
education, and maturity.

• Understanding yourself better is the first
step to becoming more effective when
working with others.

• Learning about other people’s DiSC styles
can help you understand their priorities
and how they may differ from your own.

• You can improve the quality of your
workplace by using DiSC to build more
effective relationships.

OVERVIEW OF THE DiSC MODEL

Dominance

• Direct
• Firm
• Strong-willed
• Forceful
• Results-oriented

Influence

• Outgoing
• Enthusiastic
• Optimistic
• High-spirited
• Lively

Conscientiousness

• Analytical
• Reserved
• Precise
• Private
• Systematic

Steadiness

• Even-tempered
• Accommodating
• Patient
• Humble
• Tactful

VANESSA WOODARD

3
© by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.

Your DiSC® Overview
YOUR DOT
This report is personalized to you, Vanessa. In order to get
the most out of your Everything DiSC Workplace® Profile,
you’ll need to understand how to read your personal map.

As you saw on the previous page, the Everything DiSC®
model is made up of four basic styles: D, i, S, and C. Each
style is divided into three regions. The picture to the right
illustrates the 12 different regions where a person’s dot
might be located.

Your DiSC® Style: S

Your dot location shows your DiSC® style. Because your dot
is located in the middle of the S region, you have an S style.

Keep in mind that everyone is a blend of all four styles, but
most people tend strongly toward one or two styles. Whether
your dot is in the center of one style or in a region that
borders two, no dot location is better than another. All DiSC
styles are equal and valuable in their own ways.

CLOSE TO THE EDGE OR CLOSE TO THE CENTER?
A dot’s distance from the edge of the circle shows how naturally inclined a person is to encompass the
characteristics of his or her DiSC style. A dot positioned toward the edge of the circle indicates a strong inclination
toward the characteristics of the style. A dot located between the edge and the center of the circle indicates a
moderate inclination. And a dot positioned close to the center of the circle indicates a slight inclination. A dot in the
center of the circle is no better than one on the edge, and vice versa. Your dot location is about halfway between
the edge of the circle and the center, so you are moderately inclined and probably relate fairly well to the
characteristics associated with the S style.

WHAT’S NEXT?

Now that you know more about the personalization of your Everything DiSC Workplace Map, you’ll read more about
what your dot location says about you. Then you’ll learn about your personal map shading and priorities, and
discover how this affects your preferences. After that, you’ll learn some basics about the other DiSC styles and how
to use that information to connect better with everyone in your workplace.

VANESSA WOODARD

4
© by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Your S Style
YOUR DOT TELLS A STORY
Because you have an S style, Vanessa, you’re likely a cooperative
person who takes pride in doing your part to help the team. You
probably don’t need to win to feel good about yourself. In fact, when
you receive credit for a job well done, you may be quick to share it with
others.

You probably tend to be fairly accommodating, and you may find it
important to maintain the approval of others. Consequently, you’re
likely to put a fair amount of energy into catering to other people. In
fact, at times you may have difficulty saying no, and you may fail to let
people know when you’ve been inconvenienced.

Since you have a need for harmony, conflict is probably difficult for
you. Most likely, you’re troubled by the idea of hurting someone’s
feelings, and you may spend time dwelling on incidents that other
people wouldn’t think twice about. In group situations, you may prefer
the role of peacemaker, but when things become heated, you may shut
down and simply wait for the tension to pass.

Most likely, you’re fairly comfortable working quietly behind the scenes. While you like to feel appreciated, you may
get somewhat embarrassed if the praise is too public or gushing. And, because you sometimes downplay your own
performance, others may fail to recognize your contributions altogether.

Because you’re often trusting, you probably give people the benefit of the doubt. Likewise, when people present
new ideas, you may try to keep an open mind and show support. And, if someone fails to meet your expectations,
you’d sometimes rather redo the work than give negative feedback because you don’t want to damage the
relationship.

You tend to be soft-spoken, and your fear of speaking out of turn may cause you to keep ideas to yourself. And,
because you sometimes speak hesitantly and qualify your statements, others may find your ideas unconvincing.
However, because filtering your responses comes so naturally to you, you may not realize how much more efficient
it would be to say exactly what you’re thinking.

Compared to others, you probably have more patience for long, routine projects. Because you like stability, you may
prefer to have procedures to guide your work. Similarly, you want to have a clear understanding of what’s expected
of you so that you don’t let anyone down. You probably feel most secure when you’ve perfected a set of specialized
skills that you can perform reliably.

You tend to be on the careful side, avoiding risk when possible. Because you assume that rules and traditions are
there for a reason, you probably dislike shortcuts. When considering bold changes, you may focus more on the
possibility of failure than on the potential benefits. You may require quite a bit of certainty before making major
decisions, and this indecisiveness can stand in the way of progress.

Vanessa, like others with the S style, your most valuable contributions to the workplace may include your
acceptance of others, your dependability, and your ability to be a team player. In fact, these are probably some of
the qualities that others admire most about you.

VANESSA WOODARD

5
© by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.

Shading & Priorities
YOUR SHADING EXPANDS THE STORY

Vanessa, while your dot location and your DiSC® style can
say a great deal about you, your map shading is also
important.

The eight words around the Everything DiSC map are what
we call priorities, or the primary areas where people focus
their energy. The closer your shading comes to a priority, the
more likely you are to focus your energy on that area.
Everyone has at least three priorities, and sometimes people
have four or five. Having five priorities is no better than
having three, and vice versa.

Typically, people with the S style have shading that touches
Support, Stability, and Collaboration. Your shading is
characteristic of the S style.

WHAT PRIORITIES SHAPE YOUR WORKPLACE EXPERIENCE?
Giving

Support

Vanessa, you find satisfaction in accommodating others. You’re usually patient and agreeable, and you’re happy to
listen or lend a hand whenever someone needs it. Furthermore, because tense situations make you uncomfortable,
you may be happy to go along with ideas even if you don’t necessarily agree with them. You’re willing to put your
own needs aside in the interest of giving others support.

Maintaining Stability
People with the S style tend to be reliable and cautious. Since you prefer a calm and harmonious environment, you
probably focus on avoiding surprises and keeping things predictable. Likewise, you do your best to provide
consistency, and people know they can count on you to follow through. Because a calm, secure environment is
important to you, you put your energy into maintaining stability.

Valuing

Collaboration

Like others with the S style, you value cooperation and interaction. Most likely, you want to be seen as a team
player, and you do your best to make sure everyone feels included and heard. Because you tend to see others’
points of view, you’re able to provide the empathy that makes people feel understood and accepted. You focus on
making personal connections by collaborating to create a warm, friendly environment.

VANESSA WOODARD

6
© by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Motivators & Stressors
WHAT MOTIVATES YOU?
Different people find different aspects of their work
motivating. Like other people with the S style, you probably
enjoy being able to help other people by giving them the
support they need to do their best work. Most likely, you
have a strong preference for stable, harmonious
environments where people work collaboratively and show
compassion for one another.

You probably enjoy many of the following aspects of your
work:

• Contributing to a calm, stable atmosphere
• Working with people who genuinely care about one

another
• Creating helpful systems and procedures
• Supporting people when they face a challenge
• Being complimented on a job well done
• Helping people work together
• Progressing steadily toward a goal
• Working with people who sincerely listen to your

concerns
• Being around people who are empathetic and accepting

WHAT IS STRESSFUL FOR YOU?

Then there are those aspects of your work that are stressful for you. Because you value stability, you may have a
difficult time with competitive environments or ideas that are too risky. Situations that involve ambiguity may be
equally stressful. And because conflict often makes you uncomfortable, you may find it difficult to work with
particularly forceful or combative people.

Many of the following aspects of your work may be stressful for you:

• Dealing with angry, pushy, or argumentative people
• Working under pressure
• Making forced decisions
• Working without clear guidelines
• Giving people negative feedback
• Being insistent with others
• Working in a chaotic environment
• Taking risks
• Having to argue for your point of view

VANESSA WOODARD

7
© by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Overview of DiSC®
The graphic below provides a snapshot of the four basic DiSC® styles.

Dominance Influence
Priorities: getting immediate results,
taking action, challenging self and
others

Motivated by: power and authority,
competition, winning, success

Fears: loss of control, being taken
advantage of, vulnerability

You will notice: self-confidence,
directness, forcefulness, risk-taking

Limitations: lack of concern for
others, impatience, insensitivity

Priorities: expressing enthusiasm, taking
action, encouraging collaboration

Motivated by: social recognition, group
activities, friendly relationships

Fears: social rejection, disapproval, loss
of influence, being ignored

You will notice: charm, enthusiasm,
sociability, optimism, talkativeness

Limitations: impulsiveness, lack of
follow-through, disorganization

Conscientiousness Steadiness
Priorities: ensuring accuracy,
maintaining stability, challenging
assumptions

Motivated by: opportunities to use
expertise or gain knowledge, attention
to quality

Fears: criticism, slipshod methods,
being wrong

You will notice: precision, analysis,
skepticism, reserve, quiet

Limitations: overly critical, tendency
to overanalyze, isolates self

Priorities: giving support, maintaining
stability, enjoying collaboration

Motivated by: stable environments,
sincere appreciation, cooperation,

opportunities to help

Fears: loss of stability, change, loss of
harmony, offending others

You will notice: patience, team player,
calm approach, good listener, humility

Limitations: overly accommodating,
tendency to avoid change, indecisiveness

Active
Fast-paced
Assertive
Dynamic

Bold

Questioning
Logic-focused

Objective
Skeptical

Challenging

Accepting
People-focused

Empathizing
Receptive
Agreeable

Thoughtful
Calm

Methodical
Moderate-paced

Careful

VANESSA WOODARD

8
© by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.
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The D Style & You
HOW MIGHT YOU REACT TO THE D STYLE?
Imagine that you regularly interact with someone with a D style.
She’s well-respected by the organization as a go-getter who delivers
on her promises, but you probably find her direct, businesslike
approach to be intimidating. Also, because you tend to be more
sympathetic and supportive, you may have trouble relating to her
competitive drive for results.

To you, this colleague seems to thrive on rapid progress, often
driving toward bold and radical change. Because you prefer a stable
and peaceful work environment, her quick pace probably makes you
pretty uncomfortable. And since you value personal connections
and want everyone to get along, you may wonder why she seems to
push for fast action without stopping to consider how her insistent
approach affects other people.

Furthermore, you probably don’t relate to her skeptical and
questioning nature very well since you prefer to focus on the
positive. She may not seem as interested in teamwork as you are,
and you may wonder why she seems to prefer to challenge ideas
rather than maintain harmony.

To you, people with the D style may seem:
• Demanding
• Blunt
• Forceful
• Dominant

WHAT IS THE MOTIVATION FOR THEIR BEHAVIOR?

Results

People with the D style tend to be strong-willed individuals who prioritize Results. Because they are so driven, they
constantly look for new challenges and opportunities. They strive for success and won’t give up just because they
run into a few obstacles. You may have trouble relating to their competitiveness, but they view this as a chance to
test themselves and excel.

Action
In addition, they prioritize Action, so they focus on achieving their goals quickly and forcefully. Cautious and
predictable environments are particularly tedious for them, and they may get impatient if others spend a lot of time
analyzing ideas rather than acting on them. Their bold style may be difficult for you to relate to since you probably
prefer to work at a more moderate pace.

Challenge

Furthermore, those with the D style also prioritize Challenge. Because they want to control outcomes, they’re often
questioning and independent-minded. They are unlikely to accept things they’re unsure about, and they won’t
hesitate to challenge ideas that they don’t agree with. Since you tend to be more accepting and warm, you may
have trouble understanding why they seem a bit more stubborn and demanding.

VANESSA WOODARD

9
© by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.

The i Style & You
HOW MIGHT YOU REACT TO THE i STYLE?
Now, imagine that you also work with someone with an i style. He
seems to know everyone on a first-name basis and always has the
latest scoop. You probably admire his positive outlook and his
enthusiasm, but you may find his high energy and optimism to be a
bit overwhelming.

You may notice that he seems to be drawn to fast action and enjoys
initiating rapid change. Because you value stability and
predictability, his constantly on-the-go approach may seem
scattered to you. And since you like to have a heads-up when
change is coming, his spontaneity and flexibility can be a bit
overwhelming to you.

You both value collaboration and teamwork, so you might welcome
opportunities to work together on projects. To you, he seems
comfortable in the spotlight, and because you also enjoy the social
aspects of work, you probably appreciate his fun, outgoing nature.
However, because you’re so accommodating, you may end up
carrying his weight behind the scenes after he’s already moved on.

To you, people with the i style may seem:
• Talkative
• Friendly
• High-spirited
• Scattered

WHAT IS THE MOTIVATION FOR THEIR BEHAVIOR?

Enthusiasm

People with the i style put a high priority on Enthusiasm and tend to maintain an upbeat attitude. Because they get
excited about new possibilities, they may be very expressive when communicating their ideas. You probably
appreciate their warmth, but you may find their high-spirited style to be a bit overwhelming at times.

Action
In addition, they prioritize Action, so they focus on making quick progress toward exciting solutions. Because they
tend to be fast-paced, they may be eager to get going without spending a lot of time considering the consequences.
Since you’re more cautious, you may have trouble relating to their spontaneous approach and their tendency to
steer toward adventurous rather than safe ideas.

Collaboration
Furthermore, those with the i style also prioritize Collaboration. They enjoy meeting new people, and they probably
have a talent for getting everyone involved and building team spirit. They appreciate teamwork and often gather the
group to work on projects collaboratively. While you share their interest in teamwork, you probably prefer to take a
more behind-the-scenes approach to working collaboratively.

VANESSA WOODARD

10
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The S Style & You
HOW MIGHT YOU REACT TO THE S STYLE?
Now, let’s imagine that you regularly interact with someone who
also has an S style and shares your desire to support the needs of
others. To you, he seems kind and easygoing, and whenever you
ask him a question, he’s always patient and happy to help. And
because you’re both so accommodating, you probably find it easy to
work together on projects.

Around the office he’s often referred to as a “rock,” and because
you share his desire for stability, you may appreciate his tendency
to keep the group on an even keel. He is well-liked by everyone, and
like you, he can always be counted on to perform his job
consistently.

Like you, he tends to keep a low profile and to feel a bit
uncomfortable when someone showers him with praise. In
response to this kind of recognition, he tends to say, “It’s really not a
big deal.” Since you’re both so agreeable and cooperative, it never
feels like a competition, and you probably enjoy collaborating with
each other.

To you, people with the S style may seem:
• Considerate
• Caring
• Understanding
• Gentle

WHAT IS THE MOTIVATION FOR THEIR BEHAVIOR?

Support
People with the S style place a high priority on providing Support. They tend to be good listeners, and as a result,
they’re often seen as patient and accommodating. They don’t hesitate to help out when they can, and they value a
warm and easygoing environment. You probably find it easy to relate to their laidback, helpful approach, and both
of you are likely to do what it takes to maintain a friendly, harmonious environment.

Stability
In addition, they prioritize Stability, so they often focus on maintaining a predictable, orderly environment. Since
they tend to be cautious, they’re probably methodical and avoid rapid change whenever possible. Because you also
avoid risks, you probably appreciate their preference for dependability and follow-through.

Collaboration
Furthermore, people with the S style also prioritize Collaboration. They enjoy working with others in a trusting,
warm environment, and they may go out of their way to make sure people feel included and accepted. Because you
share this focus on friendly teamwork, the two of you may relate well to each other and work together to maintain
an open, receptive atmosphere.

VANESSA WOODARD

11
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The C Style & You
HOW MIGHT YOU REACT TO THE C STYLE?
Imagine that you regularly interact with someone with a C style.
She’s not highly sociable, and you may have trouble relating to her
impersonal approach. Because she wants quality and accuracy, she
tends to hole up in her office for long stretches of time, checking
her work two or three times before being satisfied. As a result, she
may seem too solitary, and you’d probably prefer to work more
collaboratively together.

Like you, she wants a stable environment where she can ensure
reliable outcomes, and you probably appreciate that she thinks
carefully before acting. Furthermore, this colleague seems precise
and dependable, and because she likes to analyze risks, she’s
unlikely to push for bold ideas or drastic changes that might make
you uncomfortable.

Furthermore, while you’re likely to accept people and ideas at face
value, she tends to ask a lot of probing questions. At times, you may
think her challenging approach is cold. And because she seems so
skeptical, you may be hesitant to approach her about collaborating.
Still, you can trust that she will follow through on commitments.

To you, people with the C style may seem:
• Detached
• Precise
• Analytical
• Reliable

WHAT IS THE MOTIVATION FOR THEIR BEHAVIOR?

Accuracy

People with the C style place a high priority on Accuracy. Because they want to ensure superior results, they tend to
analyze options rationally and separate emotions from facts. They value being precise, and as result, they will often
ask in-depth or skeptical questions. You may have trouble relating to their detached, logical approach since you
appreciate more warmth.

Stability
In addition, they prioritize Stability. Because they tend to value follow-through and restraint, they’re uncomfortable
with quick or risky decisions and prefer to take time to make an informed choice. They tend to analyze all the
options, and they often make decisions that promise predictable outcomes. Their cautious nature may be easy for
you to relate to, since you also like to spend time ensuring dependable results.

Challenge
Furthermore, people with the C style also prioritize Challenge. In their quest to find the most streamlined or
productive method of completing their tasks, they may openly question ideas and point out flaws that others may
have missed. Since you have a more accepting approach, you may find them overly skeptical or fault-finding.

VANESSA WOODARD

12
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Connecting with D
WHEN YOU NEED TO BE MORE EFFECTIVE
Vanessa, people with the D style like to get right to the point, and
this might affect the way you relate to one another. They’re willing
to be straightforward or even blunt in the interest of making rapid
progress. You’re more likely to be tactful and soft-spoken, so they
may dominate discussions with you. While they may not see this as
a problem, you probably feel somewhat intimidated by them. At the
same time, they may become frustrated by your unwillingness to
speak up.

Therefore, when you need to be more effective with people who
have the D style, consider the following strategies:

• Speak up with your ideas and opinions early in the conversation.
• Remember that they appreciate a direct approach, so don’t be

afraid to tell them what you’re thinking.
• Be prepared for their candor.

WHEN PROBLEMS NEED TO BE SOLVED
Compared to people with the D style, you’re much more likely to be agreeable and accommodating when solving
problems. Because they can be very strong-willed and willing to make quick, firm decisions, they may overlook your
input if you hesitate to speak up. And, since you tend to be more cautious and avoid risky moves, they may see you
as indecisive or wishy-washy.

Therefore, when solving problems with people who have the D style, consider the following strategies:

• Avoid appearing too hesitant or indecisive.
• Be willing to take a stronger stance.
• Speak up to make sure you have a voice in the solution.

WHEN THINGS GET TENSE

Because you want to maintain harmony, you’re less likely than your “D” coworkers to challenge ideas and point out
problems. They’re probably very frank and even argumentative in conflict, so you may try to avoid them during
tense situations. While you may start by trying to play peacemaker, when confronted, you may withdraw completely
or just let them have their way. As a result, they may assume that an issue is resolved when you have simply buried
your resentment.

Therefore, when things get tense with people who have the D style, consider the following strategies:

• Avoid giving in to their demands just to regain harmony.
• Be aware that hiding your true feelings could be more harmful than speaking candidly.
• Speak up to make sure that your needs are considered.

VANESSA WOODARD

13
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Connecting with i
WHEN YOU NEED TO BE MORE EFFECTIVE
Because people with the i style are extremely outgoing, Vanessa,
they share your priority on working collaboratively. However, even
though you both enjoy working as a team, they’re probably a bit
more adventurous and sociable than you are. At times, they may
push you to open up more than is comfortable for you, and if you
hold back, they may see you as too restrained.

Therefore, when you need to be more effective with people who
have the i style, consider the following strategies:

• Speak up when you’re concerned about how plans affect other
people.

• Show them that you value your working relationship by
maximizing opportunities to collaborate together.

• Recognize the value of their enthusiasm and high energy.

WHEN PROBLEMS NEED TO BE SOLVED
People with the i style rely heavily on intuition, and they like to dive in and act quickly when confronting a problem.
For this reason, your tendency to avoid fast decisions, especially when confronted with major changes, may strike
them as overly cautious. Since you tend to be supportive, you may go along with their plans, even if you’re
uncomfortable. However, their inclination toward exciting options might clash with the traditional approaches you
prefer.

Therefore, when solving problems with people who have the i style, consider the following strategies:

• Show them that you’re open to creative solutions.
• Share your doubts rather than just going along with their ideas to make them happy.
• Balance your desire for stability with the opportunities provided by their adventurous approach.

WHEN THINGS GET TENSE
Because people with the i style want to maintain friendly relationships, they share your tendency to initially gloss
over differences. However, they’re so focused on being heard that they’re more likely to become emotional and lash
out when confronted. And, since you’re so focused on harmony, you may give in just to keep them happy. As a
result, you may fail to resolve the conflict and allow your buried resentment to build.

Therefore, when things get tense with people who have the i style, consider the following strategies:

• Refrain from burying your own feelings just to regain harmony.
• Address the issues directly but empathically.
• Let them know that facing the disagreement now will help maintain a good relationship down the road.

VANESSA WOODARD

14
© by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.

Connecting with S
WHEN YOU NEED TO BE MORE EFFECTIVE
People who share your S style value cooperation and friendly
interaction, Vanessa, and this might affect the way you relate to one
another. Like them, you prioritize collaboration and want group
harmony. However, the two of you might be so considerate that
neither of you speaks up about your own needs. In addition, you
both probably prefer an easygoing, gentle approach, and as a result,
you may fail to push yourselves to ask tough questions when
working together.

Therefore, when you need to be more effective with people who
have the S style, consider the following strategies:

• Share what you’re really thinking and let them know that you
genuinely want to hear their opinions.

• Encourage each other to move outside of your comfort zones
and take on new challenges.

• Work collaboratively with them, but don’t overlook potential
problems.

WHEN PROBLEMS NEED TO BE SOLVED
Because you also have an S style, you probably share their tendency to hesitate before making decisions when it
comes to solving problems. This is probably especially true when you’re facing rapid change that might affect
people around you. As a result, situations may go on for too long without resolution. In addition, both of you may
fail to consider bold options, and this may lead to predictable or bland solutions.

Therefore, when solving problems with people who have the S style, consider the following strategies:

• Establish a deadline to avoid delaying decisions and find ways to make minor decisions more quickly together.
• Consider risks, but remember that sometimes a daring idea can bring more satisfying results.
• Don’t let your shared reluctance to rock the boat keep you from considering more creative options.

WHEN THINGS GET TENSE
Because people who share your S style want to support others, they avoid rocking the boat and upsetting the
people around them. You both shy away from addressing issues head-on, so open conflict is probably rare between
you. However, this may result in an environment where both of you are walking on eggshells. In fact, your shared
unwillingness to address conflict directly may even lead to situations where communication breaks down entirely
and hidden hostility increases.

Therefore, when things get tense with people who have the S style, consider the following strategies:

• Address the situation directly rather than masking your differences.
• Express your concern for their feelings and show a desire to work through the conflict quickly but thoroughly.
• Be aware that holding in your feelings could be more harmful than speaking candidly.

VANESSA WOODARD

15
© by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.

Connecting with C
WHEN YOU NEED TO BE MORE EFFECTIVE
Vanessa, people with the C style would often rather focus on facts
than feelings, and this might affect the way you relate to one
another. They tend to focus on precision, so they probably
appreciate your calm, methodical approach. However, since they
tend to be skeptical and analytical, they may see your trusting,
supportive nature as naïve, while you may find their down-to-
business attitude to be a little cold.

Therefore, when you need to be more effective with people who
have the C style, consider the following strategies:

• Focus on the fact-based aspects of ideas and projects.
• Don’t be put off by their reserved, sometimes skeptical

approach.
• Respect their preference to work independently.

WHEN PROBLEMS NEED TO BE SOLVED
When it comes to solving problems, your “C” coworkers want to thoroughly consider all the consequences before
making a decision, while you’re probably concerned with how plans might affect other people. As a result, you both
may postpone decisions, especially if they involve a lot of change. This mutual caution may also cause the two of
you to spend time second-guessing plans, which can weigh you down in the problem-solving process.

Therefore, when solving problems with people who have the C style, consider the following strategies:

• Set a timeline for finding a solution and balance your shared caution with the need for urgency.
• Avoid getting bogged down in trying to find the perfect plan that meets everyone’s needs.
• Join them in careful analysis, but remember to keep an eye on the timeline.

WHEN THINGS GET TENSE
Because people with the C style often view conflict as a disagreement over who is correct, they usually avoid direct
aggression and focus on challenging the reasoning behind an argument. Because you also prefer to avoid
confrontations, you may give in to their factual arguments or fail to assert your needs. As a result, the two of you
may neglect to resolve the conflict and allow it to simmer beneath the surface.

Therefore, when things get tense with people who have the C style, consider the following strategies:

• Be more assertive about your needs, since they may not realize when your feelings have been hurt.
• Give yourselves time to process, but don’t allow the situation to linger indefinitely.
• Assert your own position instead of just giving in to their logical arguments.

VANESSA WOODARD

16
© by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.

Taking Action
Vanessa, given everything you’ve learned about your style, what follows are three key strategies that might help
you work more effectively with all the people in your workplace.

TAKE CARE TO GET THINGS RIGHT THE
FIRST TIME

Because you tend to be fairly laid-back and flexible, you’re
probably willing to accept things if they seem “good
enough.” However, people who are more accuracy-focused
might feel disrespected if your lack of precision obligates
them to redo their work. By analyzing the deeper issues,
you’ll minimize wasted time and effort.

• Be tougher about enforcing high standards.
• Show a willingness to analyze the details rather than just

going with the flow.

BE DIRECT WITH TOUGH FEEDBACK

Because you want to be agreeable and prefer to work in an environment where people get along, you may avoid
giving unfavorable feedback. While giving constructive criticism may make you uncomfortable, keep in mind that it
can help the group work more effectively and keep small problems from becoming major issues. Just stick to the
facts and deliver the message in a warm but unapologetic manner.

• Remind yourself that being candid with people will help build your relationships in the long term.
• Ask yourself whether you would want to know the truth if you were in the other person’s position.

BE FIRM AND STAND YOUR GROUND

You may find it hard to take a firm stance when you feel you’re being pressured to take a different direction. As
you’ve probably discovered, a lot of people are willing to push their plans on someone who they think will give in. If
you continually back off from your own ideas too easily, people might assume you’re generally indifferent, and they
may have less regard for your preferences in the future.

• Remind yourself that just because others are confident doesn’t mean their ideas are better than yours.
• Consider the long-term consequences of letting your ideas be stifled.

STAY CONNECTED

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VANESSA WOODARD

17
© by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Personalized Index: D Styles
D

C STYLE

Challenge
Results

Accuracy

Goals: Independence, personal
accomplishment

Judges others by: Competence,
common sense

Influences others by: High
standards, determination

Overuses: Bluntness; sarcastic or
condescending attitude

Under pressure: Becomes overly
critical

Fears: Failure to achieve their
standards

Would increase effectiveness
through: Warmth, tactful
communication

Vanessa, people with the DC style prioritize Challenge, so they want to
explore all options and make sure that the best possible methods are
used. As a result, they may be very questioning and skeptical of other
people’s ideas. You aren’t as questioning as they are, so you may have
trouble relating to their challenging approach.

In addition, they also prioritize Results, so they’re often very direct and
straightforward. When they’re focused on the bottom line, they may
overlook the feelings of others. You may have trouble relating to what
you see as an excessive drive for results.

Finally, those with the DC style also prioritize Accuracy. Because they
want to control the quality of their work, they prefer to work
independently, and they may focus on separating emotions from facts.
You may have trouble relating to their analytical approach.

D STYLE

Results
Action

Challenge

Goals: Bottom-line results, victory

Judges others by: Ability to achieve
results

Influences others by: Assertiveness,
insistence, competition

Overuses: The need to win, resulting
in win/lose situations

Under pressure: Becomes impatient
and demanding

Fears: Being taken advantage of,
appearing weak

Would increase effectiveness
through: Patience, empathy

People with the D style are strong-willed individuals who prioritize
Results. Because they want to make their mark, they constantly look for
new challenges and opportunities. You may have trouble relating to
their competitiveness, but they view this as a chance to test themselves
and excel.

In addition, they also prioritize Action, so they often focus on achieving
their goals quickly and forcefully. Since they tend to be very fast-paced,
they like it when people cut to the chase. Their bold style may be
difficult for you to relate to since you probably prefer to work at a more
moderate pace.

Furthermore, those with the D style also prioritize Challenge. Because
they want to control outcomes, they’re often questioning and
independent-minded. Since you tend to be more accepting and warm,
you may have trouble understanding why they seem a bit more
stubborn and demanding.

D

i STYLE

Action
Results

Enthusiasm

Goals: Quick action, new
opportunities

Judges others by: Confidence,
influence

Influences others by: Charm, bold
action

Overuses: Impatience, egotism,
manipulation

Under pressure: Becomes
aggressive, overpowers others

Fears: Loss of power

Would increase effectiveness
through: Patience, humility,
consideration of others’ ideas

People with the Di style prioritize Action, and they probably come
across as adventurous and bold. Because they grow bored easily, these
individuals often seek out unique assignments and leadership
positions. You prefer to keep a steadier pace, so you may not relate
well to their energetic approach.

In addition, they also prioritize Results, so they often work to
accomplish their goals rapidly. While they are competitive, they can
also use charm to persuade others to help them succeed. You may
think they are too focused on results.

Finally, those with the Di style also prioritize Enthusiasm, so they may
come across as charming and fun because of their high energy. They
probably use their excitement to inspire others and to create a lively
environment. You may have trouble relating to their high-spirited
approach.

VANESSA WOODARD

18
© by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.

Personalized Index: i Styles
iD STYLE

Action
Enthusiasm

Results

Goals: Exciting breakthroughs

Judges others by: Ability to think
creatively, charisma

Influences others by: Boldness,
passion

Overuses: Impulsiveness,
outspokenness

Under pressure: Becomes impulsive,
lashes out at others

Fears: Fixed environments, loss of
approval or attention

Would increase effectiveness
through: Focusing on the details,
patience, listening to others

Vanessa, people with the iD style prioritize Action, so they tend to focus
on moving toward their goals quickly. They like to maintain a fast pace,
and they’re probably comfortable making decisions on the fly. You may
have a difficult time keeping up with their rapid pace.

In addition, they also prioritize Enthusiasm, and they may come across
as high-energy people who like to rally others around a common goal.
Most likely, they maintain an upbeat attitude and bring a genuine
optimism to their work. You may think their high level of enthusiasm is
a bit distracting.

Furthermore, those with the iD style also prioritize Results, so they may
come across as ambitious and goal-oriented. Most likely, they enjoy
leveraging relationships to achieve new accomplishments. To you, it
may seem that their quest for results overlooks other important
factors.

i STYLE

Enthusiasm
Action

Collaboration

Goals: Popularity, approval,
excitement

Judges others by: Openness, social
skills, enthusiasm

Influences others by: Charm,
optimism, energy

Overuses: Optimism, praise

Under pressure: Becomes
disorganized, gets overly expressive

Fears: Rejection, not being heard

Would increase effectiveness
through: Being more objective,
following through on tasks

People with the i style put a high priority on Enthusiasm and tend to
maintain an upbeat attitude. They get excited about new possibilities,
and they may be very expressive when communicating their ideas. You
probably appreciate their warmth, but you may find their high-spirited
style to be a bit overwhelming at times.

In addition, they prioritize Action, so they often focus on making quick
progress toward exciting solutions. Since they tend to be fast-paced,
they may be eager to get going without spending a lot of time
considering the consequences. Since you’re more cautious, you may
have trouble relating to their spontaneous approach and their tendency
to steer toward adventurous rather than safe ideas.

Furthermore, those with the i style also value Collaboration. They
usually enjoy meeting new people, and they may have a talent for
getting everyone involved and building team spirit. While you share their
interest in teamwork, you probably prefer to take a more behind-the-
scenes approach to working collaboratively.

i

S STYLE

Collaboration
Enthusiasm

Support

Goals: Friendship

Judges others by: Ability to see
good in others, warmth

Influences others by:
Agreeableness, empathy

Overuses: Patience with others,
indirect approaches

Under pressure: Takes criticism
personally, avoids conflict

Fears: Pressuring others, being
disliked

Would increase effectiveness
through: Acknowledging others’
flaws, confronting problems

People with the iS style prioritize Collaboration, so they enjoy teaming
up with others as much as possible. Because they want everyone to
feel included, they tend to spend time and energy getting people
involved. Since you share their desire to work with others, you may be
just as eager as they are to turn tasks into group projects.

In addition, they also prioritize Enthusiasm, and they’re likely to bring a
positive attitude to their work and relationships. They’re light-hearted
and encouraging, and they often like to spread their optimistic spirit to
others. You tend to be less expressive than they are, and you may have
trouble relating to their happy-go-lucky approach.

Furthermore, those with the iS style also value Support, so they tend to
be flexible people who want what’s best for the group. When others
struggle, they tend to show concern and offer uncritical support. Since
you share their desire to help others, you can probably relate to their
patient, accepting approach.

VANESSA WOODARD

19
© by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.

Personalized Index: S Styles
Si STYLE

Collaboration
Support

Enthusiasm

Goals: Acceptance, close
relationships

Judges others by: Receptivity to
others, approachability

Influences others by: Showing
empathy, being patient

Overuses: Kindness, personal
connections

Under pressure: Avoids conflict,
tries to make everyone happy

Fears: Being forced to pressure
others, facing aggression

Would increase effectiveness
through: Saying “no” if necessary,
addressing issues

Vanessa, people with the Si style prioritize Collaboration, and they like
to involve others in making decisions. Most likely, they try to build team
spirit and are less concerned with individual accomplishment. Because
you share their tendency to work collaboratively, you probably
appreciate their desire for team unity.

In addition, they also prioritize Support, so they tend to place a high
importance on the needs of others. Because they have an
accommodating nature, they’re often willing to set aside their own
opinions and needs to help others. Since you probably share their
interest in people’s feelings, you may find it easy to relate to their
tendency to look out for others.

Furthermore, those with the Si style also value Enthusiasm, and they
usually come across as cheerful. They tend to see the positive in most
situations, and they’re encouraging of other people’s ideas. Most likely,
you have trouble relating to their expressive style.

S STYLE

Support
Stability

Collaboration

Goals: Harmony, stability

Judges others by: Dependability,
sincerity

Influences others by:
Accommodating others, consistent
performance

Overuses: Modesty, passive
resistance, compromise

Under pressure: Gives in, avoids
revealing true opinions

Fears: Letting people down, rapid
change

Would increase effectiveness
through: Displaying self-confidence,
revealing true feelings

People with the S style place a high value on providing Support. They
tend to be good listeners, and as a result they’re often seen as patient
and accommodating. You probably find it easy to relate to their
laidback, helpful approach, and both of you are likely to do what it takes
to maintain a friendly, harmonious environment.

In addition, they also prioritize Stability, so they often focus on
maintaining a predictable, orderly environment. Since they tend to be
cautious, they may use a methodical pace and avoid rapid change
whenever possible. Because you also avoid risks, you probably
appreciate their preference for dependability and follow-through.

Furthermore, people with the S style also prioritize Collaboration.
Because they value a trusting, warm environment, they may go out of
their way to make sure people feel included and accepted. Because you
share this focus on friendly teamwork, the two of you may relate well to
each other and work together to maintain an open, receptive
atmosphere.

SC STYLE

Stability
Support

Accuracy

Goals: Calm environment, fixed
objectives, steady progress

Judges others by: Reliability,
realistic outlook, even temperament

Influences others by: Diplomacy,
self-control, consistency

Overuses: Willingness to let others
lead, humility

Under pressure: Becomes inflexible,
hinders spontaneity, complies

Fears: Time pressure, uncertainty,
chaos

Would increase effectiveness
through: Initiating change, speaking
up

People with the SC style place a high priority on Stability and attaining
consistent outcomes. Because they tend to be cautious, they may
prefer to work in a predictable environment that won’t bring a lot of
surprises. Since you share their desire for stability, you can probably
appreciate their careful, methodical approach.

In addition, they also prioritize Support, so they tend to be
accommodating and willing to forfeit their own needs and preferences
when necessary. Most likely, they’re usually patient and diplomatic, and
they aren’t likely to become overly emotional when pushed. Because
you share a willingness to help others, you probably find it easy to
relate to their patient, obliging approach.

Furthermore, those with the SC style also value Accuracy. They tend to
work systematically to produce quality work and effective solutions,
and they may be fairly analytical at times. You may have trouble relating
to their methodical approach and tendency to double-check their work.

VANESSA WOODARD

20
© by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited.

Personalized Index: C Styles
CS STYLE

Stability
Accuracy
Support

Goals: Stability, reliable outcomes

Judges others by: Precise
standards, orderly methods

Influences others by: Practicality,
attention to detail

Overuses: Traditional methods,
sense of caution

Under pressure: Withdraws,
becomes hesitant

Fears: Emotionally charged
situations, ambiguity

Would increase effectiveness
through: Showing flexibility, being
decisive, showing urgency

Vanessa, people with the CS style prioritize Stability, so they probably
come across as orderly and precise. Since they prefer to be well-
prepared, they tend to avoid taking risks or making rapid changes.
Because you share their interest in a stable environment, you may
appreciate their tendency to focus on steady progress.

In addition, they also place a high priority on Accuracy, so they tend to
spend time refining their ideas before moving forward. Most likely, they
rely on data before making decisions and tend to take an objective
approach. You may find it hard to relate to their insistence on careful
analysis.

Furthermore, those with the CS style also value Support, and they’re
usually willing to help when their expertise is needed. They also tend to
be even-tempered and patient with both people and difficult situations.
Because you share their obliging approach, both of you may fail to
assert your own needs to avoid rocking the boat.

C STYLE

Accuracy
Stability

Challenge

Goals: Accuracy, objective
processes

Judges others by: Expertise,
systematic processes

Influences others by: Logic,
exacting standards

Overuses: Analysis, restraint

Under pressure: Overwhelms others
with logic, becomes rigid

Fears: Being wrong, strong displays
of emotion

Would increase effectiveness
through: Acknowledging others’
feelings, looking beyond data

People with the C style place a high priority on Accuracy. Because they
want to ensure superior results, they tend to analyze options rationally
and separate emotions from facts. You may have trouble relating to
their detached, logical approach since you appreciate more warmth.

In addition, they also prioritize Stability. Since they tend to value follow-
through and restraint, they’re uncomfortable with quick or risky
decisions and prefer to take time to make an informed choice. Their
cautious nature may be easy for you to relate to, since you also like to
spend time ensuring dependable results.

Furthermore, people with the C style also prioritize Challenge. In their
quest to find the most streamlined or productive method of completing
their tasks, they may openly question ideas and point out flaws that
others may have missed. Since you have a more accepting approach,
you may find them overly skeptical or fault-finding.

CD STYLE

Challenge
Accuracy
Results

Goals: Efficient results, rational
decisions

Judges others by: Competence, use
of logic

Influences others by: Strict
standards, resolute approach

Overuses: Bluntness, critical attitude

Under pressure: Ignores people’s
feelings, moves ahead
independently

Fears: Failure, lack of control

Would increase effectiveness
through: Cooperation, paying
attention to others’ needs

People with the CD style prioritize Challenge and may come across as
skeptical and determined. Most likely, they won’t accept ideas without
asking a lot of questions, and they like to uncover problems that could
affect results. You tend to be more accepting, so you may find it hard to
relate to their critical, questioning approach.

In addition, they also prioritize Accuracy, and they focus on thinking
logically to create the best solutions. They tend to avoid letting their
emotions get in the way of making rational decisions. To you, their
approach may seem overly analytical and perfectionistic.

Furthermore, those with the CD style also value Results and tend to be
determined to deliver quality outcomes efficiently. Most likely, they’re
also willing to take charge of projects when necessary, and they can
usually be counted on to keep things on track. Their determination to
get results may seem stubborn or impatient to you at times.

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