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Interface names may vary among network device types. The interface names shown in the topology image are consistent with those found in the lab activity document. Use the IOS show interface and show controllers commands to determine the actual interface names for the devices used in the lab pod.

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When you have completed the activities, answer the questions that are within the individual labs in a Word Document. Within your submission, include your completed

Lab Assignment Report

. Save and name your file, “CIS204_U2_LabAssignment_LastName x”.

You must complete the activities in the following order:

  • Lab 7.1.4.8: Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
    Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features
  • Lab 4.2.2.5: Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPV4
    Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPV4
  • Lab 5.1.5.5: Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
    Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features
  • Lab 5.2.3.7: Troubleshooting Advanced EIGRP
    Troubleshooting Advanced EIGRP
  • Lab 7.2.3.4: Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2
    Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2

© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 1 of 10

Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4

Topology

Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4

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Addressing Table

Device Interface IP Address Subnet Mask Default Gateway

R1 G0/0 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

S0/0/0 (DCE) 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.252 N/A

S0/0/1 10.3.3.1 255.255.255.252 N/A

R2 G0/0 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

S0/0/0 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.252 N/A

S0/0/1 (DCE) 10.2.2.2 255.255.255.252 N/A

R3 G0/0 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

S0/0/0 (DCE) 10.3.3.2 255.255.255.252 N/A

S0/0/1 10.2.2.1 255.255.255.252 N/A

PC-A NIC 192.168.1.3 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.1

PC-B NIC 192.168.2.3 255.255.255.0 192.168.2.1

PC-C NIC 192.168.3.3 255.255.255.0 192.168.3.1

Objectives

Part 1: Build the Network and Verify Connectivity

Part 2: Configure EIGRP Routing

Part 3: Verify EIGRP Routing

Part 4: Configure Bandwidth and Passive Interfaces

Background / Scenario

Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) is a powerful distance vector routing protocol and is
relatively easy to configure for basic networks.

In this lab, you will configure EIGRP for the topology and networks shown above. You will modify bandwidth
and configure passive interfaces to allow EIGRP to function more efficiently.

Note: The routers used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) with
Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 (universalk9 image). Other routers and Cisco IOS versions can be used.
Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary
from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at the end of this lab for the
correct interface identifiers.

Note: Make sure that the routers have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure,
contact your instructor.

Required Resources

 3 Routers (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)

 3 PCs (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)

 Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

 Ethernet and serial cables as shown in the topology

Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4

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Part 1: Build the Network and Verify Connectivity

In Part 1, you will set up the network topology and configure basic settings, such as the interface IP
addresses, device access, and passwords.

Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.

Step 2: Configure PC hosts.

Step 3: Initialize and reload the routers as necessary.

Step 4: Configure basic settings for each router.

a. Disable DNS lookup.

b. Configure IP addresses for the routers, as listed in the Addressing Table.

c. Configure device name as shown in the topology.

d. Assign cisco as the console and vty passwords.

e. Assign class as the privileged EXEC password.

f. Configure logging synchronous to prevent console and vty messages from interrupting command entry.

g. Configure a message of the day.

h. Copy the running configuration to the startup configuration.

Step 5: Verify connectivity.

The routers should be able to ping one another, and each PC should be able to ping its default gateway. The
PCs will not be able to ping other PCs until EIGRP routing is configured. Verify and troubleshoot if necessary.

Part 2: Configure EIGRP Routing

Step 1: Enable EIGRP routing on R1. Use AS number 10.

R1(config)# router eigrp 10

Step 2: Advertise the directly connected networks on R1 using the wildcard mask.

R1(config-router)# network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.3

R1(config-router)# network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255

R1(config-router)# network 10.3.3.0 0.0.0.3

Why is it a good practice to use wildcard masks when advertising networks? Could the mask have been
omitted from any of the network statements above? If so, which one(s)?

Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4

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Step 3: Enable EIGRP routing and advertise the directly connected networks on R2 and R3.

You will see neighbor adjacency messages as interfaces are added to the EIGRP routing process. The
messages on R2 are displayed as an example.

*Apr 14 15:24:59.543: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv4 10: Neighbor 10.1.1.1

(Serial0/0/0) is up: new adjacency

Step 4: Verify end-to-end connectivity.

All devices should be able to ping each other if EIGRP is configured correctly.

Note: Depending on the operating system, it may be necessary to disable the firewall for the pings to the host
PCs to be successful.

Part 3: Verify EIGRP Routing

Step 1: Examine the EIGRP neighbor table.

On R1, issue the show ip eigrp neighbors command to verify that the adjacency has been established with
its neighboring routers.

R1# show ip eigrp neighbors

EIGRP-IPv4 Neighbors for AS(10)

H Address Interface Hold Uptime SRTT RTO Q Seq

(sec) (ms) Cnt Num

1 10.3.3.2 Se0/0/1 13 00:24:58 8 100 0 17

0 10.1.1.2 Se0/0/0 13 00:29:23 7 100 0 23

Step 2: Examine the IP EIGRP routing table.

R1# show ip route eigrp

Codes: L – local, C – connected, S – static, R – RIP, M – mobile, B – BGP

D – EIGRP, EX – EIGRP external, O – OSPF, IA – OSPF inter area

N1 – OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 – OSPF NSSA external type 2

E1 – OSPF external type 1, E2 – OSPF external type 2

i – IS-IS, su – IS-IS summary, L1 – IS-IS level-1, L2 – IS-IS level-2

ia – IS-IS inter area, * – candidate default, U – per-user static route

o – ODR, P – periodic downloaded static route, H – NHRP, l – LISP

+ – replicated route, % – next hop override

Gateway of last resort is not set

10.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 5 subnets, 2 masks

D 10.2.2.0/30 [90/2681856] via 10.3.3.2, 00:29:01, Serial0/0/1

[90/2681856] via 10.1.1.2, 00:29:01, Serial0/0/0

D 192.168.2.0/24 [90/2172416] via 10.1.1.2, 00:29:01, Serial0/0/0

D 192.168.3.0/24 [90/2172416] via 10.3.3.2, 00:27:56, Serial0/0/1

Why does R1 have two paths to the 10.2.2.0/30 network?

Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4

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Step 3: Examine the EIGRP topology table.

R1# show ip eigrp topology

EIGRP-IPv4 Topology Table for AS(10)/ID(192.168.1.1)

Codes: P – Passive, A – Active, U – Update, Q – Query, R – Reply,

r – reply Status, s – sia Status

P 192.168.3.0/24, 1 successors, FD is 2172416

via 10.3.3.2 (2172416/28160), Serial0/0/1

P 192.168.2.0/24, 1 successors, FD is 2172416

via 10.1.1.2 (2172416/28160), Serial0/0/0

P 10.2.2.0/30, 2 successors, FD is 2681856

via 10.1.1.2 (2681856/2169856), Serial0/0/0

via 10.3.3.2 (2681856/2169856), Serial0/0/1

P 10.3.3.0/30, 1 successors, FD is 2169856

via Connected, Serial0/0/1

P 192.168.1.0/24, 1 successors, FD is 2816

via Connected, GigabitEthernet0/0

P 10.1.1.0/30, 1 successors, FD is 2169856

via Connected, Serial0/0/0

Why are there no feasible successors listed in the R1 topology table?

Step 4: Verify the EIGRP routing parameters and networks advertised.

Issue the show ip protocols command to verify the EIGRP routing parameters used.

R1# show ip protocols

*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***

Routing Protocol is “eigrp 10”

Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set

Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set

Default networks flagged in outgoing updates

Default networks accepted from incoming updates

EIGRP-IPv4 Protocol for AS(10)

Metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0

NSF-aware route hold timer is 240

Router-ID: 192.168.1.1

Topology : 0 (base)

Active Timer: 3 min

Distance: internal 90 external 170

Maximum path: 4

Maximum hopcount 100

Maximum metric variance 1

Automatic Summarization: disabled

Maximum path: 4

Routing for Networks:

10.1.1.0/30

Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4

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10.3.3.0/30

192.168.1.0

Routing Information Sources:

Gateway Distance Last Update

10.3.3.2 90 02:38:34

10.1.1.2 90 02:38:34

Distance: internal 90 external 170

Based on the output of issuing the show ip protocols command, answer the following questions.

What AS number is used?

What networks are advertised?

What is the administrative distance for EIGRP?

How many equal cost paths does EIGRP use by default?

Part 4: Configure Bandwidth and Passive Interfaces

EIGRP uses a default bandwidth based on the type of interface in the router. In Part 4, you will modify the
bandwidth so that the link between R1 and R3 has a lower bandwidth than the link between R1/R2 and
R2/R3. In addition, you will set passive interfaces on each router.

Step 1: Observe the current routing settings.

a. Issue the show interface s0/0/0 command on R1.

R1# show interface s0/0/0

Serial0/0/0 is up, line protocol is up

Hardware is WIC MBRD Serial

Internet address is 10.1.1.1/30

MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit/sec, DLY 20000 usec,

reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255

Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set

Keepalive set (10 sec)

Last input 00:00:01, output 00:00:02, output hang never

Last clearing of “show interface” counters 03:43:45

Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0

Queueing strategy: fifo

Output queue: 0/40 (size/max)

5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec

5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec

4050 packets input, 270294 bytes, 0 no buffer

Received 1554 broadcasts (0 IP multicasts)

0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles

1 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 1 abort

4044 packets output, 271278 bytes, 0 underruns

0 output errors, 0 collisions, 5 interface resets

4 unknown protocol drops

0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out

12 carrier transitions

DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

What is the default bandwidth for this serial interface?

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b. How many routes are listed in the routing table to reach the 10.2.2.0/30 network?

Step 2: Modify the bandwidth on the routers.

a. Modify the bandwidth on R1 for the serial interfaces.

R1(config)# interface s0/0/0

R1(config-if)# bandwidth 2000

R1(config-if)# interface s0/0/1

R1(config-if)# bandwidth 64

Issue show ip route command on R1. Is there a difference in the routing table? If so, what is it?

Codes: L – local, C – connected, S – static, R – RIP, M – mobile, B – BGP
D – EIGRP, EX – EIGRP external, O – OSPF, IA – OSPF inter area
N1 – OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 – OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 – OSPF external type 1, E2 – OSPF external type 2
i – IS-IS, su – IS-IS summary, L1 – IS-IS level-1, L2 – IS-IS level-2
ia – IS-IS inter area, * – candidate default, U – per-user static route
o – ODR, P – periodic downloaded static route, H – NHRP, l – LISP
+ – replicated route, % – next hop override

Gateway of last resort is not set

10.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 5 subnets, 2 masks

C 10.1.1.0/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0

L 10.1.1.1/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0

D 10.2.2.0/30 [90/2681856] via 10.1.1.2, 00:03:09, Serial0/0/0

C 10.3.3.0/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1

L 10.3.3.1/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1

192.168.1.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks

C 192.168.1.0/24 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0

L 192.168.1.1/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0

D 192.168.2.0/24 [90/1794560] via 10.1.1.2, 00:03:09, Serial0/0/0

D 192.168.3.0/24 [90/2684416] via 10.1.1.2, 00:03:08, Serial0/0/0

b. Modify the bandwidth on the R2 and R3 serial interfaces.

R2(config)# interface s0/0/0

R2(config-if)# bandwidth 2000

R2(config-if)# interface s0/0/1

R2(config-if)# bandwidth 2000

R3(config)# interface s0/0/0

R3(config-if)# bandwidth 64

R3(config-if)# interface s0/0/1

R3(config-if)# bandwidth 2000

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Step 3: Verify the bandwidth modifications.

a. Verify bandwidth modifications. Issue a show interface serial 0/0/x command, with x being the
appropriate serial interface on all three routers to verify that bandwidth is set correctly. R1 is shown as an
example.

R1# show interface s0/0/0
Serial0/0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is WIC MBRD Serial
Internet address is 10.1.1.1/30

MTU 1500 bytes, BW 2000 Kbit/sec, DLY 20000 usec,

reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set
Keepalive set (10 sec)
Last input 00:00:01, output 00:00:02, output hang never

Last clearing of “show interface” counters 04:06:06

Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
Queueing strategy: fifo
Output queue: 0/40 (size/max)
5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec

4767 packets input, 317155 bytes, 0 no buffer

Received 1713 broadcasts (0 IP multicasts)

0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
1 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 1 abort

4825 packets output, 316451 bytes, 0 underruns

0 output errors, 0 collisions, 5 interface resets
4 unknown protocol drops
0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
12 carrier transitions
DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Based on your bandwidth configuration, try and determine what the R2 and R3 routing tables will look like
before you issue a show ip route command. Are their routing tables the same or different?

Step 4: Configure G0/0 interface as passive on R1, R2, and R3.

A passive interface does not allow outgoing and incoming routing updates over the configured interface. The
passive-interface interface command causes the router to stop sending and receiving Hello packets over an
interface; however, the network associated with the interface is still advertised to other routers through the
non-passive interfaces. Router interfaces connected to LANs are typically configured as passive.

R1(config)# router eigrp 10

R1(config-router)# passive-interface g0/0

R2(config)# router eigrp 10

R2(config-router)# passive-interface g0/0

R3(config)# router eigrp 10

R3(config-router)# passive-interface g0/0

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Step 5: Verify the passive interface configuration.

Issue a show ip protocols command on R1, R2, and R3 and verify that G0/0 has been configured as
passive.

R1# show ip protocols
*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***

Routing Protocol is “eigrp 10”
Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set
Default networks flagged in outgoing updates
Default networks accepted from incoming updates
EIGRP-IPv4 Protocol for AS(10)
Metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0
NSF-aware route hold timer is 240
Router-ID: 192.168.1.1
Topology : 0 (base)
Active Timer: 3 min

Distance: internal 90 external 170

Maximum path: 4

Maximum hopcount 100
Maximum metric variance 1

Automatic Summarization: disabled
Maximum path: 4
Routing for Networks:

10.1.1.0/30

10.3.3.0/30
192.168.1.0

Passive Interface(s):

GigabitEthernet0/0

Routing Information Sources:
Gateway Distance Last Update

10.3.3.2 90 00:48:09

10.1.1.2 90 00:48:26

Distance: internal 90 external 170

Reflection

You could have used only static routing for this lab. What is an advantage of using EIGRP?

Lab – Configuring Basic EIGRP for IPv4

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Router Interface Summary Table

Router Interface Summary

Router Model Ethernet Interface #1 Ethernet Interface #2 Serial Interface #1 Serial Interface #2

1800 Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)

Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

1900 Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)

Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)

Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

2801 Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)

Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0) Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)

2811 Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

2900 Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)

Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many
interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router
class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device.
The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An
example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be
used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.

TextField1:

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Lab – Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features

Topology

Lab – Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features

© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 2 of 10

Addressing Table

Device Interface IP Address Subnet Mask Default Gateway

R1 G0/0 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

S0/0/0 (DCE) 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252 N/A

S0/0/1 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252 N/A

R2 Lo0 209.165.200.225 255.255.255.252 N/A

S0/0/0 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252 N/A

S0/0/1 (DCE) 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252 N/A

R3 G0/0 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

S0/0/0 (DCE) 192.168.13.2 255.255.255.252 N/A

S0/0/1 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252 N/A

PC-A NIC 192.168.1.3 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.1

PC-C NIC 192.168.3.3 255.255.255.0 192.168.3.1

Objectives

Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings

Part 2: Configure and Verify OSPF Routing

Part 3: Change OSPF Metrics

Part 4: Configure and Propagate a Static Default Route

Part 5: Configure OSPF Authentication

Background / Scenario

Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) has advanced features to allow changes to be made to control metrics,
default route propagation, and security.

In this lab, you will adjust OSPF metrics on the router interfaces, configure OSPF route propagation, and use
Message Digest 5 (MD5) authentication to secure OSPF routing information.

Note: The routers used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) with
Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 (universalk9 image). Other routers and Cisco IOS versions can be used.
Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary
from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at the end of this lab for the
correct interface identifiers.

Note: Make sure that the routers have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure,
contact your instructor.

Required Resources

 3 Routers (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)

 2 PCs (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)

 Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

 Ethernet and serial cables as shown in the topology

Lab – Configuring OSFPv2 Advanced Features

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Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings

In Part 1, you will set up the network topology and configure basic settings on the PC hosts and routers.

Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.

Step 2: Initialize and reload the routers as necessary.

Step 3: Configure basic settings for each router.

a. Disable DNS lookup.

b. Configure device name as shown in the topology.

c. Assign class as the privileged EXEC password.

d. Assign cisco as the console and vty passwords.

e. Encrypt the clear text passwords.

f. Configure a MOTD banner to warn users that unauthorized access is prohibited.

g. Configure logging synchronous for the console line.

h. Configure the IP addresses listed in the Addressing Table for all interfaces.

i. Set the clock rate for all DCE serial interfaces at 128000.

j. Copy the running configuration to the startup configuration.

Step 4: Configure PC hosts.

Refer to the Addressing Table for PC host address information.

Step 5: Test connectivity.

At this point, the PCs are unable to ping each other. However, the routers should be able to ping the directly
connected neighbor interfaces, and the PCs should be able to ping their default gateway. Verify and
troubleshoot if necessary.

Part 2: Configure and Verify OSPF Routing

In Part 2, you will configure OSPFv2 routing on all routers in the network and then verify that routing tables
are updated correctly.

Step 1: Configure the router ID on all routers.

Assign 1 as the process ID for this OSPF process. Each router should be given the following router ID
assignments:

 R1 Router ID: 1.1.1.1

 R2 Router ID: 2.2.2.2

 R3 Router ID: 3.3.3.3

Step 2: Configure OSPF network information on the routers.

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Step 3: Verify OSPF routing.

a. Issue the show ip ospf neighbor command to verify that each router is listing the other routers in the
network.

b. Issue the show ip route ospf command to verify that all OSPF networks are present in the routing table
on all routers.

Step 4: Test end-to-end connectivity.

Ping PC-C from PC-A to verify end-to-end connectivity. The pings should be successful. If they are not,
troubleshoot as necessary.

Note: It may be necessary to disable the PC firewall for the pings to be successful.

Part 3: Change OSPF Metrics

In Part 3, you will change OSPF metrics using the bandwidth command, the auto-cost reference-
bandwidth command, and the ip ospf cost command. Making these changes will provide more accurate
metrics to OSPF.

Note: All DCE interfaces should have been configured with a clocking rate of 128000 in Part 1.

Step 1: Change the bandwidth on all serial interfaces to 128Kb/s.

a. Issue the show ip ospf interface brief command to view the default cost settings on the router
interfaces.

R1# show ip ospf interface brief

Interface

PID Area IP Address/Mask Cost State Nbrs F/C

Se0/0/1 1 0 192.168.13.1/30 64 P2P 1/1

Se0/0/0 1 0 192.168.12.1/30 64 P2P 1/1

Gi0/0 1 0 192.168.1.1/24 1 DR 0/0

b. Use the bandwidth 128 interface command on all serial interfaces.

c. Issue the show ip ospf interface brief command to view the new cost settings.

R1# show ip ospf interface brief
Interface PID Area IP Address/Mask Cost State Nbrs F/C

Se0/0/1 1 0 192.168.13.1/30 781 P2P 1/1

Se0/0/0 1 0 192.168.12.1/30 781 P2P 1/1

Gi0/0 1 0 192.168.1.1/24 1 DR 0/0

Step 2: Change the reference bandwidth on the routers.

a. Issue the auto-cost reference-bandwidth 1000 command on the routers to change the default reference
bandwidth setting to account for Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces.

b. Re-issue the show ip ospf interface brief command to view how this command has changed cost
values.

R1# show ip ospf interface brief
Interface PID Area IP Address/Mask Cost State Nbrs F/C

Se0/0/1 1 0 192.168.13.1/30 7812 P2P 0/0

Se0/0/0 1 0 192.168.12.1/30 7812 P2P 0/0

Gi0/0 1 0 192.168.1.1/24 1 DR 0/0

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Note: If the router had Fast Ethernet interfaces instead of Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, then the cost would
now be 10 on those interfaces.

Step 3: Change the route cost.

a. Issue the show ip route ospf command to display the current OSPF routes on R1. Notice that there are
currently two routes in the table that use the S0/0/1 interface.

R1# show ip route ospf

Codes: L – local, C – connected, S – static, R – RIP, M – mobile, B – BGP

D – EIGRP, EX – EIGRP external, O – OSPF, IA – OSPF inter area

N1 – OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 – OSPF NSSA external type 2

E1 – OSPF external type 1, E2 – OSPF external type 2

i – IS-IS, su – IS-IS summary, L1 – IS-IS level-1, L2 – IS-IS level-2

ia – IS-IS inter area, * – candidate default, U – per-user static route

o – ODR, P – periodic downloaded static route, H – NHRP, l – LISP

+ – replicated route, % – next hop override

Gateway of last resort is not set

O 192.168.3.0/24 [110/7822] via 192.168.13.2, 00:00:12, Serial0/0/1

192.168.23.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets

O 192.168.23.0 [110/15624] via 192.168.13.2, 00:00:12, Serial0/0/1

[110/15624] via 192.168.12.2, 00:20:03, Serial0/0/0

b. Apply the ip ospf cost 16000 command to the S0/0/1 interface on R1. A cost of 16,000 is higher than the
accumulated cost of the route through R2 which is 15,624.

c. Issue the show ip ospf interface brief command on R1 to view the cost change to S0/0/1.

R1# show ip ospf interface brief
Interface PID Area IP Address/Mask Cost State Nbrs F/C

Se0/0/1 1 0 192.168.13.1/30 16000 P2P 1/1

Se0/0/0 1 0 192.168.12.1/30 7812 P2P 1/1

Gi0/0 1 0 192.168.1.1/24 1 DR 0/0

d. Re-issue the show ip route ospf command on R1 to display the effect this change has made on the
routing table. All OSPF routes for R1 are now being routed through R2.

R1# show ip route ospf
Codes: L – local, C – connected, S – static, R – RIP, M – mobile, B – BGP
D – EIGRP, EX – EIGRP external, O – OSPF, IA – OSPF inter area
N1 – OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 – OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 – OSPF external type 1, E2 – OSPF external type 2
i – IS-IS, su – IS-IS summary, L1 – IS-IS level-1, L2 – IS-IS level-2
ia – IS-IS inter area, * – candidate default, U – per-user static route
o – ODR, P – periodic downloaded static route, H – NHRP, l – LISP
+ – replicated route, % – next hop override

Gateway of last resort is not set

O 192.168.3.0/24 [110/15625] via 192.168.12.2, 00:05:31, Serial0/0/0

192.168.23.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets

O 192.168.23.0 [110/15624] via 192.168.12.2, 01:14:02, Serial0/0/0

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Explain why the route to the 192.168.3.0/24 network on R1 is now going through R2?

Part 4: Configure and Propagate a Static Default Route

In Part 4, you will use a loopback interface on R2 to simulate an ISP connection to the Internet. You will
create a static default route on R2, and then OSPF will propagate that route to the other two routers on the
network.

Step 1: Configure a static default route on R2 to loopback 0.

Configure a default route using the loopback interface configured in Part 1, to simulate a connection to an
ISP.

Step 2: Have OSPF propagate the default static route.

Issue the default-information originate command to include the static default route in the OSPF updates
that are sent from R2.

R2(config)# router ospf 1

R2(config-router)# default-information originate

Step 3: Verify OSPF static route propagation.

a. Issue the show ip route static command on R2.

R2# show ip route static

Codes: L – local, C – connected, S – static, R – RIP, M – mobile, B – BGP
D – EIGRP, EX – EIGRP external, O – OSPF, IA – OSPF inter area
N1 – OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 – OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 – OSPF external type 1, E2 – OSPF external type 2
i – IS-IS, su – IS-IS summary, L1 – IS-IS level-1, L2 – IS-IS level-2
ia – IS-IS inter area, * – candidate default, U – per-user static route
o – ODR, P – periodic downloaded static route, H – NHRP, l – LISP
+ – replicated route, % – next hop override

Gateway of last resort is 0.0.0.0 to network 0.0.0.0

S* 0.0.0.0/0 is directly connected, Loopback0

b. Issue the show ip route command on R1 to verify the propagation of the static route from R2.

R1# show ip route

Codes: L – local, C – connected, S – static, R – RIP, M – mobile, B – BGP
D – EIGRP, EX – EIGRP external, O – OSPF, IA – OSPF inter area
N1 – OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 – OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 – OSPF external type 1, E2 – OSPF external type 2
i – IS-IS, su – IS-IS summary, L1 – IS-IS level-1, L2 – IS-IS level-2
ia – IS-IS inter area, * – candidate default, U – per-user static route
o – ODR, P – periodic downloaded static route, H – NHRP, l – LISP
+ – replicated route, % – next hop override

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Gateway of last resort is 192.168.12.2 to network 0.0.0.0

O*E2 0.0.0.0/0 [110/1] via 192.168.12.2, 00:02:57, Serial0/0/0

192.168.1.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks

C 192.168.1.0/24 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0

L 192.168.1.1/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0

O 192.168.3.0/24 [110/15634] via 192.168.12.2, 00:03:35, Serial0/0/0

192.168.12.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks

C 192.168.12.0/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0

L 192.168.12.1/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0

192.168.13.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks

C 192.168.13.0/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1

L 192.168.13.1/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1

192.168.23.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets

O 192.168.23.0 [110/15624] via 192.168.12.2, 00:05:18, Serial0/0/0

c. Verify end-to-end connectivity by issuing a ping from PC-A to the ISP interface address 209.165.200.225.

Were the pings successful?

Part 5: Configure OSPF Authentication

OSPF authentication can be set up at the link level or the area level. There are three authentication types
available for OSPF authentication: Null, plain text, or MD5. In Part 5, you will set up OSPF MD5
authentication, which is the strongest available.

Step 1: Set up MD5 OSPF authentication on a single link.

a. Issue the debug ip ospf adj command on R2 to view OSPF adjacency messages.

R2# debug ip ospf adj

OSPF adjacency debugging is on

b. Assign an MD5 key for OSPF Authentication on R1, interface S0/0/0.

R1(config)# interface s0/0/0

R1(config-if)# ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5KEY

c. Activate MD5 authentication on R1, interface S0/0/0.

R1(config-if)# ip ospf authentication message-digest

OSPF debug messages informing you of a Mismatched Authentication type displays on R2.

*Mar 19 00:03:18.187: OSPF-1 ADJ Se0/0/0: Rcv pkt from 192.168.12.1 : Mismatched

Authentication type. Input packet specified type 2, we use type 0

d. Issue the u all command, which is the shortest version of the undebug all command on R2 to disable
debugging.

e. Configure OSPF authentication on R2, interface S0/0/0. Use the same MD5 password you entered for
R1.

f. Issue a show ip ospf interface s0/0/0 command on R2. This command displays the type of
authentication at the bottom of the output.

R2# show ip ospf interface s0/0/0

Serial0/0/0 is up, line protocol is up

Internet Address 192.168.12.2/30, Area 0, Attached via Network Statement

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Process ID 1, Router ID 2.2.2.2, Network Type POINT_TO_POINT, Cost: 7812

Topology-MTID Cost Disabled Shutdown Topology Name

0 7812 no no Base

Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State POINT_TO_POINT

Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5

oob-resync timeout 40

Hello due in 00:00:03

Supports Link-local Signaling (LLS)

Cisco NSF helper support enabled

IETF NSF helper support enabled

Index 1/1, flood queue length 0

Next 0x0(0)/0x0(0)

Last flood scan length is 1, maximum is 1

Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 0 msec

Neighbor Count is 1, Adjacent neighbor count is 1

Adjacent with neighbor 1.1.1.1

Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)

Message digest authentication enabled

Youngest key id is 1

Step 2: Set up OSPF Authentication at the area level.

a. Issue the area 0 authentication command to set MD5 authentication for OSPF Area 0 on R1.

R1(config)# router ospf 1

R1(config-router)# area 0 authentication message-digest

b. This option still requires that you assign the MD5 password at the interface level.

R1(config)# interface s0/0/1

R1(config-if)# ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5KEY

c. Issue the show ip ospf neighbor command on R3. R1 no longer has an adjacency with R3.

R3# show ip ospf neighbor

Neighbor ID Pri State Dead Time Address Interface

2.2.2.2 0 FULL/ – 00:00:31 192.168.23.1 Serial0/0/1

d. Set up area authentication on R3 and assign the same MD5 password to interface S0/0/0.

R3(config)# router ospf 1

R3(config-router)# area 0 authentication message-digest

R3(config-router)# interface s0/0/0

R3(config-if)# ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5KEY

e. Issue the show ip ospf neighbor command on R3. Notice that R1 is now showing as a neighbor, but R2
is missing.

R3# show ip ospf neighbor

Neighbor ID Pri State Dead Time Address Interface

1.1.1.1 0 FULL/ – 00:00:38 192.168.13.1 Serial0/0/0

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Why is R2 no longer showing as an OSPF neighbor?

f. Configure R2 to perform area-level MD5 authentication.

R2(config)# router ospf 1

R2(config-router)# area 0 authentication message-digest

g. Assign MD5KEY as the MD5 password for the link between R2 and R3.

h. Issue the show ip ospf neighbor command on all routers to verify that all adjacencies have been re-
established.

R1# show ip ospf neighbor

Neighbor ID Pri State Dead Time Address Interface

3.3.3.3 0 FULL/ – 00:00:39 192.168.13.2 Serial0/0/1

2.2.2.2 0 FULL/ – 00:00:35 192.168.12.2 Serial0/0/0

R2# show ip ospf neighbor

Neighbor ID Pri State Dead Time Address Interface

3.3.3.3 0 FULL/ – 00:00:36 192.168.23.2 Serial0/0/1

1.1.1.1 0 FULL/ – 00:00:32 192.168.12.1 Serial0/0/0

R3# show ip ospf neighbor

Neighbor ID Pri State Dead Time Address Interface

2.2.2.2 0 FULL/ – 00:00:33 192.168.23.1 Serial0/0/1

1.1.1.1 0 FULL/ – 00:00:39 192.168.13.1 Serial0/0/0

Reflection

1. What is the easiest and preferred method of manipulating OSPF route costs?

2. What does the default-information originate command do for a network using the OSPF routing protocol?

3. Why is it a good idea to use OSPF authentication?

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Router Interface Summary Table

Router Interface Summary

Router Model Ethernet Interface #1 Ethernet Interface #2 Serial Interface #1 Serial Interface #2

1800 Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)

Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

1900 Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)

Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)

Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

2801 Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)

Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0) Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)

2811 Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

2900 Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)

Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many
interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router
class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device.
The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An
example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be
used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.

TextField1:

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Lab – Troubleshooting IPv4 and IPv6 Static Routes

Topology

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Addressing Table

Device Interface IP Address Default Gateway

HQ G0/1

192.168.0.1/25

2001:DB8:ACAD::1/64

FE80::1 link-local N/A

S0/0/0 (DCE)

10.1.1.2/30

2001:DB8:ACAD::20:2/64 N/A

S0/0/1

192.168.0.253/30

2001:DB8:ACAD:2::1/30 N/A

ISP G0/0

172.16.3.1/24

2001:DB8:ACAD:30::1/64

FE80::1 link-local N/A

S0/0/0

10.1.1.1/30

2001:DB8:ACAD:20::/64 N/A

BRANCH G0/1

192.168.1.1/24

2001:DB8:ACAD:1::1/64

FE80::1 link-local N/A
S0/0/0 (DCE)

192.168.0.254/30

2001:DB8:ACAD:2::2/64 N/A

S1 VLAN 1 N/A N/A

S3 VLAN 1 N/A N/A

PC-A NIC

192.168.0.3/25

2001:DB8:ACAD::3/64

192.168.0.1

FE80::1

Web Server NIC

172.16.3.3/24

2001:DB8:ACAD:30::3/64

172.16.3.1

FE80::1

PC-C NIC

192.168.1.3/24

2001:DB8:ACAD:1::3/64

192.168.1.1

FE80::1

Objectives

Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings

Part 2: Troubleshoot Static Routes in an IPv4 Network

Part 3: Troubleshoot Static Routes in an IPv6 Network

Background / Scenario

As a network administrator, you must be able to configure routing of traffic using static routes. Understanding
how to configure and troubleshoot static routing is a requirement. Static routes are commonly used for stub
networks and default routes. Your company’s ISP has hired you to troubleshoot connectivity issues on the
network. You will have access to the HQ, BRANCH, and the ISP routers.

OglikConsultants
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OglikConsultants
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This must be 1/64

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OglikConsultants
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In this lab, you will begin by loading configuration scripts on each of the routers. These scripts contain errors
that will prevent end-to-end communication across the network. You will need to troubleshoot each router to
determine the configuration errors, and then use the appropriate commands to correct the configurations.
When you have corrected all of the configuration errors, the hosts on the network should be able to
communicate with each other.

Note: The routers used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) with
Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 (universalk9 image). The switches used are Cisco Catalyst 2960s with Cisco
IOS Release 15.0(2) (lanbasek9 image). Other routers, switches, and Cisco IOS versions can be used.
Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary
from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at the end of this lab for the
correct interface identifiers.

Note: Make sure that the routers and switches have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you
are unsure, contact your instructor.

Required Resources

 3 Routers (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)

 2 Switches (Cisco 2960 with Cisco IOS Release 15.0(2) lanbasek9 image or comparable)

 3 PCs (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)

 Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

 Ethernet and serial cables as shown in the topology

Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings

In Part 1, you will set up the network topology and configure the routers and switches with some basic
settings, such as passwords and IP addresses. Preset configurations are also provided for you for the initial
router configurations. You will also configure the IP settings for the PCs in the topology.

Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.

Attach the devices as shown in the topology diagram and cable, as necessary.

Step 2: Initialize and reload the routers and switches.

Step 3: Configure basic settings for each router.

a. Disable DNS lookup.

b. Configure device name as shown in the topology.

c. Assign class as the privileged EXEC mode password.

d. Assign cisco as the console and vty passwords.

e. Configure logging synchronous to prevent console messages from interrupting command entry.

Step 4: Configure hosts and Web Server.

a. Configure IP addresses for IPv4 and IPv6.

b. Configure IPv4 default gateway.

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Step 5: Load router configurations.

Router HQ

hostname HQ

ipv6 unicast-routing

interface GigabitEthernet0/1

ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD::1/64

ip address 192.168.0.1 255.255.255.128

ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local

interface Serial0/0/0

ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:20::2/64

ip address 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.252

clock rate 800000

no shutdown

interface Serial0/0/1

ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:2::3/64

ip address 192.168.0.253 255.255.255.252

no shutdown

ip route 172.16.3.0 255.255.255.0 10.1.1.1

ip route 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 192.16.0.254

ipv6 route 2001:DB8:ACAD:1::/64 2001:DB8:ACAD:2::2

ipv6 route 2001:DB8:ACAD:30::/64 2001:DB8:ACAD::20:1

Router ISP

hostname ISP

ipv6 unicast-routing

interface GigabitEthernet0/0

ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:30::1/64

ip address 172.16.3.11 255.255.255.0

ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
no shutdown
interface Serial0/0/0

ipv6 address 2001:DB8::ACAD:20:1/64

ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.252

no shutdown

ip route 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 10.1.1.2

ipv6 route 2001:DB8:ACAD::/62 2001:DB8:ACAD:20::2

Router BRANCH

hostname BRANCH

ipv6 unicast-routing
interface GigabitEthernet0/1

ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:1::1/64

ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0

ipv6 address FE80::1 link-local
no shutdown

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interface Serial0/0/0

ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:2::2/64

clock rate 128000

ip address 192.168.0.249 255.255.255.252

clock rate 128000
no shutdown

ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.1.1.2

ipv6 route ::/0 2001:DB8:ACAD::1

Part 2: Troubleshoot Static Routes in an IPv4 Network

IPv4 Addressing Table

Device Interface IP Address Subnet Mask Default Gateway

HQ G0/1 192.168.0.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

S0/0/0 (DCE) 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.252 N/A

S0/0/1 192.168.0.253 255.255.255.252 N/A

ISP G0/0 172.16.3.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

S0/0/0 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.252 N/A

BRANCH G0/1 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

S0/0/0 (DCE) 192.168.0.254 255.255.255.252 N/A

S1 VLAN 1 192.168.0.11 255.255.255.128 192.168.0.1

S3 VLAN 1 192.168.1.11 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.1

PC-A NIC 192.168.0.3 255.255.255.128 192.168.0.1

Web Server NIC 172.16.3.3 255.255.255.0 172.16.3.1

PC-C NIC 192.168.1.3 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.1

Step 1: Troubleshoot the HQ router.

The HQ router is the link between the ISP router and the BRANCH router. The ISP router represents the
outside network while the BRANCH router represents the corporate network. The HQ router is configured with
static routes to ISP and BRANCH networks.

a. Display the status of the interfaces on HQ. Enter show ip interface brief. Record and resolve any issues
as necessary.

b. Ping from HQ router to BRANCH router (192.168.0.254). Were the pings successful?

c. Ping from HQ router to ISP router (10.1.1.1). Were the pings successful?

d. Ping from PC-A to the default gateway. Were the pings successful?

e. Ping from PC-A to PC-C. Were the pings successful?

f. Ping from PC-A to Web Server. Were the pings successful?

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g. Display the routing table on HQ. What non-directly connected routes are shown in the routing table?

h. Based on the results of the pings, routing table output, and static routes in the running configuration, what can
you conclude about network connectivity?

i. What commands (if any) need to be entered to resolve routing issues? Record the command(s).

j. Repeat any of the steps from b to f to verify whether the problems have been resolved. Record your
observations and possible next steps in troubleshooting connectivity.

Step 2: Troubleshoot the ISP router.

For the ISP router, there should be a route to HQ and BRANCH routers. One static route is configured on ISP
router to reach the 192.168.1.0/24, 192.168.0.0/25, and 192.168.0.252/30 networks.

a. Display the status of interfaces on ISP. Enter show ip interface brief. Record and resolve any issues as
necessary.

b. Ping from the ISP router to the HQ router (10.1.1.2). Were the pings successful?

c. Ping from Web Server to the default gateway. Were the pings successful?

d. Ping from Web Server to PC-A. Were the pings successful?

e. Ping from Web Server to PC-C. Were the pings successful?

f. Display the routing table on ISP. What non-directly connected routes are shown in the routing table?

g. Based on the results of the pings, routing table output, and static routes in the running configuration, what can
you conclude about network connectivity?

h. What commands (if any) need to be entered to resolve routing issues? Record the command(s).

(Hint: ISP only requires one summarized route to the company’s networks 192.168.1.0/24,
192.168.0.0/25, and 192.168.0.252/32.)

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i. Repeat any of the steps from b to e to verify whether the problems have been resolved. Record your
observations and possible next steps in troubleshooting connectivity.

Step 3: Troubleshoot the BRANCH router.

For the BRANCH router, a default route is set to reach the rest of the network and ISP.

a. Display the status of the interfaces on BRANCH. Enter show ip interface brief. Record and resolve any
issues, as necessary.

b. Ping from the BRANCH router to the HQ router (192.168.0.253). Were the pings successful?

c. Ping from PC-C to the default gateway. Were the pings successful?

d. Ping from PC-C to PC-A. Were the pings successful?

e. Ping from PC-C to Web Server. Were the pings successful?

f. Display the routing table on BRANCH. What non-directly connected routes are shown in the routing
table?

g. Based on the results of the pings, routing table output, and static routes in the running configuration, what can
you conclude about network connectivity?

h. What commands (if any) need to be entered to resolve routing issues? Record the command(s).

i. Repeat any of the steps from b to e to verify whether the problems have been resolved. Record your
observations and possible next steps in troubleshooting connectivity.

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Part 3: Troubleshoot Static Routes in an IPv6 Network

Device Interface IPv6 Address Prefix Length Default Gateway

HQ G0/1 2001:DB8:ACAD::1 64 N/A

S0/0/0 (DCE) 2001:DB8:ACAD::20:2 64 N/A

S0/0/1 2001:DB8:ACAD:2::1 64 N/A

ISP G0/0 2001:DB8:ACAD:30::1 64 N/A

S0/0/0 2001:DB8:ACAD:20::1 64 N/A

BRANCH G0/1 2001:DB8:ACAD:1::1 64 N/A

S0/0/0 (DCE) 2001:DB8:ACAD:2::2 64 N/A

PC-A NIC 2001:DB8:ACAD::3 64 FE80::1

Web Server NIC 2001:DB8:ACAD:30::3 64 FE80::1

PC-C NIC 2001:DB8:ACAD:1::3 64 FE80::1

Step 1: Troubleshoot the HQ router.

The HQ router is the link between the ISP router and the BRANCH router. The ISP router represents the
outside network while the BRANCH router represents the corporate network. The HQ router is configured with
static routes to both the ISP and the BRANCH networks.

a. Display the status of the interfaces on HQ. Enter show ipv6 interface brief. Record and resolve any
issues, as necessary.

b. Ping from the HQ router to the BRANCH router (2001:DB8:ACAD:2::2). Were the pings successful?

c. Ping from the HQ router to the ISP router (2001:DB8:ACAD:20::1). Were the pings successful?

d. Ping from PC-A to the default gateway. Were the pings successful?

e. Ping from PC-A to Web Server. Were the pings successful?

f. Ping from PC-A to PC-C. Were the pings successful?

g. Display the routing table by issuing a show ipv6 route command. What non-directly connected routes
are shown in the routing table?

h. Based on the results of the pings, routing table output, and static routes in the running configuration, what can
you conclude about network connectivity?

i. What commands (if any) need to be entered to resolve routing issues? Record the command(s).

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j. Repeat any of the steps from b to f to verify whether the problems have been resolved. Record your
observations and possible next steps in troubleshooting connectivity.

Step 2: Troubleshoot the ISP router.

On the ISP router, one static route is configured to reach all the networks on HQ and BRANCH routers.

a. Display the status of the interfaces on ISP. Enter show ipv6 interface brief. Record and resolve any
issues, as necessary.

b. Ping from the ISP router to the HQ router (2001:DB8:ACAD:20::2). Were the pings successful?

c. Ping from Web Server to the default gateway. Were the pings successful?
d. Ping from Web Server to PC-A. Were the pings successful?
e. Ping from Web Server to PC-C. Were the pings successful?

f. Display the routing table. What non-directly connected routes are shown in the routing table?

g. Based on the results of the pings, routing table output, and static routes in the running configuration, what can
you conclude about network connectivity?

h. What commands (if any) need to be entered to resolve routing issues? Record the command(s).

i. Repeat any of the steps from b to e to verify whether the problems have been resolved. Record your
observations and possible next steps in troubleshooting connectivity.

Step 3: Troubleshoot the BRANCH router.

For the BRANCH routers, there is a default route to the HQ router. This default route allows the BRANCH
network to the ISP router and Web Server.

a. Display the status of the interfaces on BRANCH. Enter show ipv6 interface brief. Record and resolve
any issues, as necessary.

b. Ping from the BRANCH router to the HQ router (2001:DB8:ACAD:2::1). Were the pings successful?

c. Ping from the BRANCH router to the ISP router (2001:DB8:ACAD:20::1). Were the pings successful?

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d. Ping from PC-C to the default gateway. Were the pings successful?

e. Ping from PC-C to PC-A. Were the pings successful?

f. Ping from PC-C to Web Server. Were the pings successful?

g. Display the routing table. What non-directly connected routes are shown in the routing table?

h. Based on the results of the pings, routing table output, and static routes in the running configuration, what can
you conclude about network connectivity?

i. What commands (if any) need to be entered to resolve routing issues? Record the command(s).

j. Repeat any of the steps from b to f to verify whether the problems have been resolved. Record your
observations and possible next steps in troubleshooting connectivity.

Router Interface Summary Table

Router Interface Summary

Router Model Ethernet Interface #1 Ethernet Interface #2 Serial Interface #1 Serial Interface #2

1800 Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)

Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

1900 Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)

Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)

Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

2801 Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)

Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0) Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)

2811 Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

2900 Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)

Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many
interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router
class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device.
The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An
example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be
used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.

TextField1:

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Lab – Configuring Advanced EIGRP for IPv4 Features

Topology

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Addressing Table

Device Interface IP Address Subnet Mask Default Gateway

R1 G0/0 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

S0/0/0 (DCE) 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252 N/A

S0/0/1 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252 N/A

Lo1 192.168.11.1 255.255.255.252 N/A

Lo5 192.168.11.5 255.255.255.252 N/A

Lo9 192.168.11.9 255.255.255.252 N/A

Lo13 192.168.11.13 255.255.255.252 N/A

R2 G0/0 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

S0/0/0 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252 N/A

S0/0/1 (DCE) 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252 N/A

Lo1 192.168.22.1 255.255.255.252 N/A

R3 G0/0 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

S0/0/0 (DCE) 192.168.13.2 255.255.255.252 N/A

S0/0/1 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252 N/A

Lo1 192.168.33.1 255.255.255.252 N/A

Lo5 192.168.33.5 255.255.255.252 N/A

Lo9 192.168.33.9 255.255.255.252 N/A

Lo13 192.168.33.13 255.255.255.252 N/A

PC-A NIC 192.168.1.3 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.1

PC-B NIC 192.168.2.3 255.255.255.0 192.168.2.1

PC-C NIC 192.168.3.3 255.255.255.0 192.168.3.1

Objectives

Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings

Part 2: Configure EIGRP and Verify Connectivity

Part 3: Configure Summarization for EIGRP

 Configure EIGRP for automatic summarization.

 Configure manual summarization for EIGRP.

Part 4: Configure and Propagate a Default Static Route

Part 5: Fine-Tune EIGRP

 Configure bandwidth utilization for EIGRP.

 Configure Hello and Hold timers for EIGRP.

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Part 6: Configure EIGRP Authentication

Background / Scenario

EIGRP has advanced features to allow changes related to summarization, default route propagation,
bandwidth utilization, metrics, and security.

In this lab, you will configure automatic and manual summarization for EIGRP, configure EIGRP route
propagation, fine-tune EIGRP metrics, and use MD5 authentication to secure EIGRP routing information.

Note: The routers used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) with
Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 (universalk9 image). Other routers and Cisco IOS versions can be used.
Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary
from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at this end of the lab for the
correct interface identifiers.

Note: Ensure that the routers have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure,
contact your instructor.

Required Resources

 3 Routers (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)

 3 PCs (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)

 Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

 Ethernet and serial cables as shown in the topology

Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings

In Part 1, you will set up the network topology and configure basic settings on the PC hosts and routers.

Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.

Step 2: Configure PC hosts.

Step 3: Initialize and reload the routers as necessary.

Step 4: Configure basic settings for each router.

a. Disable DNS lookup.

b. Configure device name as shown in the topology.

c. Assign cisco as the console and vty passwords.

d. Assign class as the privileged EXEC password.

e. Configure logging synchronous to prevent console messages from interrupting command entry.

f. Configure the IP address listed in the Addressing Table for all interfaces.

Note: Do NOT configure the loopback interfaces at this time.

g. Copy the running configuration to the startup configuration.

Part 2: Configure EIGRP and Verify Connectivity

In Part 2, you will configure basic EIGRP for the topology and set bandwidths for the serial interfaces.

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Note: This lab provides minimal assistance with the actual commands necessary to configure EIGRP.
However, the required commands are provided in Appendix A. Test your knowledge by trying to configure the
devices without referring to the appendix.

Step 1: Configure EIGRP.

a. On R1, configure EIGRP routing with an autonomous system (AS) ID of 1 for all directly connected
networks. Write the commands used in the space below.

b. For the LAN interface on R1, disable the transmission of EIGRP Hello packets. Write the command used
in the space below.

c. On R1, configure the bandwidth for S0/0/0 to 1024 Kb/s and the bandwidth for S0/0/1 to 64 Kb/s. Write
the commands used in the space below. Note: The bandwidth command only affects the EIGRP metric
calculation, not the actual bandwidth of the serial link.

d. On R2, configure EIGRP routing with an AS ID of 1 for all networks, disable the transmission of EIGRP
Hello packets for the LAN interface, and configure the bandwidth for S0/0/0 to 1024 Kb/s.

e. On R3, configure EIGRP routing with an AS ID of 1 for all networks, disable the transmission of EIGRP
Hello packets for the LAN interface, and configure the bandwidth for S0/0/0 to 64 Kb/s.

Step 2: Test connectivity.

All PCs should be able to ping one another. Verify and troubleshoot if necessary.

Note: It may be necessary to disable the PC firewall to ping between PCs.

Part 3: Configure Summarization for EIGRP

In Part 3, you will add loopback interfaces to R1, enable EIGRP automatic summarization on R1, and observe
the effects on the routing table for R2. You will also add loopback interfaces on R3.

Step 1: Configure EIGRP for automatic summarization.

a. Issue the show ip protocols command on R1. What is the default status of automatic summarization in
EIGRP?

b. Configure the loopback addresses on R1.

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c. Add the appropriate network statements to the EIGRP process on R1. Record the commands used in the
space below.

d. On R2, issue the show ip route eigrp command. How are the loopback networks represented in the
output?

e. On R1, issue the auto-summary command inside the EIGRP process.

R1(config)# router eigrp 1

R1(config-router)# auto-summary

R1(config-router)#

*Apr 14 01:14:55.463: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv4 1: Neighbor 192.168.13.2

(Serial0/0/1) is resync: summary configured

*Apr 14 01:14:55.463: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv4 1: Neighbor 192.168.12.2

(Serial0/0/0) is resync: summary configured

*Apr 14 01:14:55.463: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv4 1: Neighbor 192.168.13.2

(Serial0/0/1) is resync: summary up, remove components

R1(config-router)#67: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv4 1: Neighbor 192.168.12.2

(Serial0/0/0) is resync: summary up, remove components

*Apr 14 01:14:55.467: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv4 1: Neighbor 192.168.12.2

(Serial0/0/0) is resync: summary up, remove components

*Apr 14 01:14:55.467: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv4 1: Neighbor 192.168.13.2

(Serial0/0/1) is resync: summary up, remove components

How does the routing table on R2 change?

Step 2: Configure manual summarization for EIGRP.

a. Configure the loopback addresses on R3.

b. Add the appropriate network statements to the EIGRP process on R3.

c. On R2, issue the show ip route eigrp command. How are the loopback networks from R3 represented in
the output?

d. Determine the summary EIGRP route for the loopback addresses on R3. Write the summary route in the
space below.

e. For the serial interfaces on R3, issue the ip summary-address eigrp 1 network address subnet mask
command to manually summarize the networks.

R3(config)# interface s0/0/0

R3(config-if)# ip summary-address eigrp 1 192.168.33.0 255.255.255.240

R3(config-if)# exit

R3(config)# interface s0/0/1

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R3(config-if)# ip summary-address eigrp 1 192.168.33.0 255.255.255.240

*Apr 14 01:33:46.433: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv4 1: Neighbor 192.168.13.1

(Serial0/0/0) is resync: summary configured

*Apr 14 01:33:46.433: %DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: EIGRP-IPv4 1: Neighbor 192.168.23.1

(Serial0/0/1) is resync: summary configured
How does the routing table on R2 change?

Part 4: Configure and Propagate a Default Static Route

In Part 4, you will configure a default static route on R2 and propagate the route to all other routers.

a. Configure the loopback address on R2.

b. Configure a default static route with an exit interface of Lo1.

R2(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 Lo1

c. Use the redistribute static command within the EIGRP process to propagate the default static route to
other participating routers.

R2(config)# router eigrp 1

R2(config-router)# redistribute static

d. Use the show ip protocols command on R2 to verify the static route is being distributed.

R2# show ip protocols

*** IP Routing is NSF aware ***

Routing Protocol is “eigrp 1”

Outgoing update filter list for all interfaces is not set

Incoming update filter list for all interfaces is not set

Default networks flagged in outgoing updates

Default networks accepted from incoming updates

Redistributing: static

EIGRP-IPv4 Protocol for AS(1)

Metric weight K1=1, K2=0, K3=1, K4=0, K5=0

NSF-aware route hold timer is 240

Router-ID: 192.168.23.1

Topology : 0 (base)

Active Timer: 3 min

Distance: internal 90 external 170

Maximum path: 4

Maximum hopcount 100

Maximum metric variance 1

Automatic Summarization: disabled

Maximum path: 4

Routing for Networks:

192.168.2.0

192.168.12.0/30

192.168.23.0/30

Passive Interface(s):

GigabitEthernet0/0

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Routing Information Sources:

Gateway Distance Last Update

192.168.12.1 90 00:13:20

192.168.23.2 90 00:13:20

Distance: internal 90 external 170

e. On R1, issue the show ip route eigrp | include 0.0.0.0 command to view statements specific to the
default route. How is the static default route represented in the output? What is the administrative
distance (AD) for the propagated route?

Part 5: Fine-Tune EIGRP

In Part 5, you will configure the percentage of bandwidth that can be used by an EIGRP interface and change
the Hello and Hold timers for EIGRP interfaces.

Step 1: Configure bandwidth utilization for EIGRP.

a. Configure the serial link between R1 and R2 to allow only 75 percent of the link bandwidth for EIGRP
traffic.

R1(config)# interface s0/0/0

R1(config-if)# ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 75

R2(config)# interface s0/0/0

R2(config-if)# ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 75

b. Configure the serial link between R1 and R3 to allow 40 percent of the links bandwidth for EIGRP traffic.

Step 2: Configure Hello and Hold Timers for EIGRP.

a. On R2, use the show ip eigrp interfaces detail command to view the Hello and Hold timers for EIGRP.

R2# show ip eigrp interfaces detail

EIGRP-IPv4 Interfaces for AS(1)

Xmit Queue PeerQ Mean Pacing Time Multicast Pending

Interface Peers Un/Reliable Un/Reliable SRTT Un/Reliable Flow Timer Routes

Se0/0/0 1 0/0 0/0 1 0/15 50 0

Hello-interval is 5, Hold-time is 15

Split-horizon is enabled

Next xmit serial

Packetized sent/expedited: 29/1

Hello’s sent/expedited: 390/2

Un/reliable mcasts: 0/0 Un/reliable ucasts: 35/39

Mcast exceptions: 0 CR packets: 0 ACKs suppressed: 0

Retransmissions sent: 0 Out-of-sequence rcvd: 0

Topology-ids on interface – 0

Interface BW percentage is 75

Authentication mode is not set

Se0/0/1 1 0/0 0/0 1 0/16 50 0

Hello-interval is 5, Hold-time is 15
Split-horizon is enabled

Next xmit serial

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Packetized sent/expedited: 34/5

Hello’s sent/expedited: 382/2

Un/reliable mcasts: 0/0 Un/reliable ucasts: 31/42

Mcast exceptions: 0 CR packets: 0 ACKs suppressed: 2

Retransmissions sent: 0 Out-of-sequence rcvd: 0
Topology-ids on interface – 0
Authentication mode is not set

What is the default value for hello time?

What is the default value for hold time?

b. Configure S0/0/0 and S0/0/1 interfaces on R1 to use a Hello interval of 60 seconds and a Hold time of
180 seconds in that specific order.

R1(config)# interface s0/0/0

R1(config-if)# ip hello-interval eigrp 1 60

R1(config-if)# ip hold-time eigrp 1 180

R1(config)# interface s0/0/1

R1(config-if)# ip hello-interval eigrp 1 60
R1(config-if)# ip hold-time eigrp 1 180

c. Configure the serial interfaces on R2 and R3 to use a Hello interval of 60 seconds and a Hold time of 180
seconds.

d. Use the show ip eigrp interfaces detail command on R2 to verify configuration.

Part 6: Configure EIGRP Authentication

In Part 6, you will create an authentication key on all routers and configure router interfaces to use MD5
authentication for EIGRP message authentication.

Step 1: Configure authentication keys.

a. On R1, use the key chain name command in global configuration mode to create a key chain with the
label EIGRP-KEYS.

R1(config)# key chain EIGRP-KEYS

R1(config-keychain)# key 1

R1(config-keychain-key)# key-string cisco

b. Complete the configuration on R2 and R3.

c. Issue the show key chain command. You should have the same output on every router.

Step 2: Configure EIGRP link authentication.

a. Apply the following commands to active EIGRP authentication on the serial interfaces on R1.

R1# conf t

R1(config)# interface s0/0/0

R1(config-if)# ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS

R1(config-if)# ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5

R1(config-if)# interface s0/0/1

R1(config-if)# ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
R1(config-if)# ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5

b. Activate EIGRP authentication on the serial interfaces on R2 and R3.

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c. On R2, use the show ip eigrp interfaces detail command to verify authentication.

R2# show ip eigrp interfaces detail
EIGRP-IPv4 Interfaces for AS(1)
Xmit Queue PeerQ Mean Pacing Time Multicast Pending
Interface Peers Un/Reliable Un/Reliable SRTT Un/Reliable Flow Timer Routes

Se0/0/0 1 0/0 0/0 1 0/23 50 0

Hello-interval is 60, Hold-time is 180

Split-horizon is enabled
Next xmit serial

Packetized sent/expedited: 30/5

Hello’s sent/expedited: 1163/5

Un/reliable mcasts: 0/0 Un/reliable ucasts: 25/34

Mcast exceptions: 0 CR packets: 0 ACKs suppressed: 0
Retransmissions sent: 0 Out-of-sequence rcvd: 0
Topology-ids on interface – 0

Authentication mode is md5, key-chain is “EIGRP-KEYS”

Se0/0/1 1 0/0 0/0 2 0/15 50 0

Hello-interval is 60, Hold-time is 180
Split-horizon is enabled
Next xmit serial

Packetized sent/expedited: 31/1

Hello’s sent/expedited: 1354/3

Un/reliable mcasts: 0/0 Un/reliable ucasts: 28/34

Mcast exceptions: 0 CR packets: 0 ACKs suppressed: 4

Retransmissions sent: 0 Out-of-sequence rcvd: 0
Topology-ids on interface – 0
Authentication mode is md5, key-chain is “EIGRP-KEYS”

Reflection

1. What are the benefits of summarizing routes?

2. When setting EIGRP timers, why is it important to make the hold time value equal to or greater than the Hello
interval?

3. Why is it important to configure authentication for EIGRP?

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Router Interface Summary Table

Router Interface Summary

Router Model Ethernet Interface #1 Ethernet Interface #2 Serial Interface #1 Serial Interface #2

1800 Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)

Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

1900 Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)

Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)

Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

2801 Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)

Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0) Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)

2811 Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

2900 Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)

Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many
interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router
class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device.
The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An
example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be
used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.

Appendix A: Configuration Commands

Router R1

R1(config)# router eigrp 1

R1(config-router)# network 192.168.1.0

R1(config-router)# network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3

R1(config-router)# network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3

R1(config-router)# network 192.168.11.0 0.0.0.3

R1(config-router)# network 192.168.11.4 0.0.0.3

R1(config-router)# network 192.168.11.8 0.0.0.3

R1(config-router)# network 192.168.11.12 0.0.0.3

R1(config-router)# passive-interface g0/0

R1(config)# int s0/0/0

R1(config-if)# bandwidth 1024

R1(config-if)# int s0/0/1

R1(config-if)# bandwidth 64

Router R2

R2(config)# router eigrp 1

R2(config-router)# network 192.168.2.0

R2(config-router)# network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3

R2(config-router)# network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3

R2(config-router)# passive-interface g0/0

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R2(config)# int s0/0/0

R2(config-if)# bandwidth 1024

Router R3

R3(config)# router eigrp 1

R3(config-router)# network 192.168.3.0

R3(config-router)# network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3

R3(config-router)# network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3

R3(config-router)# network 192.168.33.0 0.0.0.3

R3(config-router)# network 192.168.33.4 0.0.0.3

R3(config-router)# network 192.168.33.8 0.0.0.3

R3(config-router)# network 192.168.33.12 0.0.0.3

R3(config-router)# passive-interface g0/0

R3(config)# int s0/0/0

R3(config-if)# bandwidth 64

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© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 1 of 7

Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2

Topology

Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2

© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 2 of 7

Addressing Table

Device Interface IP Address Subnet Mask Default Gateway

R1 G0/0 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

S0/0/0 (DCE) 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252 N/A

S0/0/1 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252 N/A

R2 Lo0 209.165.200.225 255.255.255.252 N/A

S0/0/0 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252 N/A

S0/0/1 (DCE) 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252 N/A

R3 G0/0 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

S0/0/0 (DCE) 192.168.13.2 255.255.255.252 N/A

S0/0/1 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252 N/A

PC-A NIC 192.168.1.3 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.1

PC-C NIC 192.168.3.3 255.255.255.0 192.168.3.1

Objectives

Part 1: Build the Network and Load Device Configurations

Part 2: Troubleshoot OSPF

Background / Scenario

OSPF is a popular routing protocol used by businesses worldwide. A Network Administrator should be able to
isolate OSPF issues and resolve those issues in a timely manner.

In this lab, you will troubleshoot a single-area OSPFv2 network and resolve all issues that exist.

Note: The routers used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) with
Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 (universalk9 image). Other routers and Cisco IOS versions can be used.
Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary
from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at the end of this lab for the
correct interface identifiers.

Note: Make sure that the routers have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure,
contact your instructor.

Required Resources

 3 Routers (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)

 3 PCs (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)

 Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

 Ethernet and serial cables, as shown in the topology

Part 1: Build the Network and Load Device Configurations

In Part 1, you will set up the network topology and configure basic settings on the PC hosts and routers.

Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2

© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 3 of 7

Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.

Step 2: Configure PC hosts.

Step 3: Load router configurations.

Load the following configurations into the appropriate router. All routers have the same passwords. The
privileged EXEC password is class. The password for console and vty lines is cisco.

Router R1 Configuration:

conf t

hostname R1

enable secret class

no ip domain lookup

interface GigabitEthernet0/0

ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0

duplex auto

speed auto

no shut

interface Serial0/0/0

bandwidth 128

ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252

ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5LINKS

clock rate 128000

no shut

interface Serial0/0/1

bandwidth 64

ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5LINKS

ip address 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252

no shut

router ospf 1

auto-cost reference-bandwidth 1000

area 0 authentication message-digest

passive-interface g0/0

network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0

network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0

network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0

banner motd

^

Unauthorized Access is Prohibited!

^

line con 0

password cisco

logging synchronous

login

line vty 0 4

password cisco

login

Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2

© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 4 of 7

transport input all

end

Router R2 Configuration:

conf t

hostname R2

enable secret class
no ip domain lookup

interface Loopback0

ip address 209.165.200.225 255.255.255.252

interface Serial0/0/0

bandwidth 182

ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5LINKS

ip address 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252

no shut
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 128
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5LINKS

ip address 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252

clock rate 128000
no shut
router ospf 1

router-id 2.2.2.2

auto-cost reference-bandwidth 1000
area 0 authentication message-digest
passive-interface g0/0
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0

network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 0

ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 Loopback0

banner motd ^

Unauthorized Access is Prohibited!
^
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
end

Router R3 Configuration:

conf t

hostname R3

enable secret class

Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2

© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 5 of 7

no ip domain lookup
interface GigabitEthernet0/0

ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0

duplex auto
speed auto
no shut
interface Serial0/0/0
bandwidth 128
ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 MD5LINKS

ip address 192.168.13.2 255.255.255.252

clock rate 128000
no shut
interface Serial0/0/1
bandwidth 128

ip address 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252

no shut
router ospf 1

router-id 3.3.3.3

area 0 authentication message-digest
passive-interface g0/0

network 192.168.3.0 0.0.0.255 area 0

network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
banner motd ^
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited!
^
line con 0
password cisco
logging synchronous
login
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
transport input all
end

Step 4: Test end-to-end connectivity.

All interfaces should be up and the PCs should be able to ping the default gateway.

Part 2: Troubleshoot OSPF

In Part 2, verify that all routers have established neighbor adjacencies, and that all network routes are
available.

Additional OSPF Requirements:

 Each router should have the following router ID assignments:

Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2

© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 6 of 7

– R1 Router ID: 1.1.1.1

– R2 Router ID: 2.2.2.2

– R3 Router ID: 3.3.3.3

 All serial interface clocking rates should be set at 128 Kb/s and a matching bandwidth setting should be

available to allow OSPF cost metrics to be calculated correctly.

 The 1941 routers have Gigabit interfaces, so the default OSPF reference bandwidth should be adjusted

to allow cost metrics to reflect appropriate costs for all interfaces.

 OSPF should propagate a default route to the Internet. This is simulated by using Loopback interface 0

on R2.

 All interfaces advertising OSPF routing information should be configured with MD5 authentication, using

MD5LINKS as the key.

List the commands used during your OSPF troubleshooting process:

List the changes made to resolve the OSPF issues. If no problems were found on the device, then respond
with “no problems were found”.

R1 Router:

R2 Router:

R3 Router:

Reflection

How would you change the network in this lab so all LAN traffic was routed through R2?

Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced Single-Area OSPFv2

© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 7 of 7

Router Interface Summary Table

Router Interface Summary

Router Model Ethernet Interface #1 Ethernet Interface #2 Serial Interface #1 Serial Interface #2

1800 Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)

Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

1900 Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)

Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)

Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

2801 Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)

Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0) Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)

2811 Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

2900 Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)

Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many
interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router
class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device.
The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An
example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be
used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.

TextField1:

© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 1 of 9

Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced EIGRP

Topology

Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced EIGRP

© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 2 of 9

Addressing Table

Device Interface IP Address Subnet Mask Default Gateway

R1 G0/0 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

Lo1 172.16.11.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

Lo2 172.16.12.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

Lo3 172.16.13.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

Lo4 172.16.14.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

S0/0/0 (DCE) 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252 N/A

S0/0/1 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252 N/A

R2 G0/0 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

Lo0 209.165.200.225 255.255.255.252 N/A

S0/0/0 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252 N/A

S0/0/1 (DCE) 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252 N/A

R3 G0/0 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

Lo3 172.16.33.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

Lo4 172.16.34.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

Lo5 172.16.35.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

Lo6 172.16.36.1 255.255.255.0 N/A

S0/0/0 (DCE) 192.168.13.2 255.255.255.252 N/A

S0/0/1 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252 N/A

PC-A NIC 192.168.1.3 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.1

PC-B NIC 192.168.2.3 255.255.255.0 192.168.2.1

PC-C NIC 192.168.3.3 255.255.255.0 192.168.3.1

Objectives

Part 1: Build the Network and Load Device Configurations

Part 2: Troubleshoot EIGRP

Background / Scenario

The Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) has advanced features to allow changes related to
summarization, default route propagation, bandwidth utilization, metrics, and security.

In this lab, you will troubleshoot a network that is running EIGRP. Advanced EIGRP features have been
implemented, but the network is now experiencing problems. You are tasked with finding and correcting the
network issues.

Note: The routers used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers (ISRs) with
Cisco IOS, Release 15.2(4)M3 (universalk9 image). Other routers and Cisco IOS versions can be used.
Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary

Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced EIGRP

© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 3 of 9

from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at the end of this lab for the
correct interface identifiers.

Note: Ensure that the routers have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure,
contact your instructor.

Required Resources

 3 Routers (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)

 3 PCs (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)

 Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

 Ethernet cables as shown in the topology

Part 1: Build the Network and Load Device Configurations

Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.

Step 2: Configure PC hosts.

Step 3: Load router configurations.

Load the following configurations into the appropriate router. All routers have the same passwords. The
privileged EXEC password is class, and cisco is the console and vty password.

Router R1 Configuration:

conf t

hostname R1

enable secret class

no ip domain lookup

key chain EIGRP-KEYS

key 1

key-string cisco123

line con 0

password cisco

login

logging synchronous

line vty 0 4

password cisco
login

banner motd @

Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! @

interface lo1

description Connection to Branch 11

ip add 172.16.11.1 255.255.255.0

interface lo2

description Connection to Branch 12

ip add 172.16.12.1 255.255.255.0

interface lo3

Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced EIGRP

© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 4 of 9

description Connection to Branch 13

ip add 172.16.13.1 255.255.255.0

interface lo4

description Connection to Branch 14

ip add 172.16.14.1 255.255.255.0

interface g0/0

description R1 LAN Connection

ip add 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0

no shutdown

interface s0/0/0

description Serial Link to R2

clock rate 128000

ip add 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.252

ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5

ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS

ip hello-interval eigrp 1 30

ip hold-time eigrp 1 90

ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 40

no shutdown

interface s0/0/1

description Serial Link to R3

bandwidth 128

ip add 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.252

ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 40
no shutdown

router eigrp 1

router-id 1.1.1.1

network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255

network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3

network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3

network 172.16.0.0 0.0.255.255

passive-interface g0/0

auto-summary

end

Router R2 Configuration:

conf t

hostname R2

enable secret class
no ip domain lookup
key chain EIGRP-KEYS
key 1

key-string Cisco123

line con 0

Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced EIGRP

© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 5 of 9

password cisco
login
logging synchronous
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
banner motd @
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! @
interface g0/0

description R2 LAN Connection

ip add 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0

no shutdown
interface s0/0/0

description Serial Link to R1

bandwidth 128

ip add 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.252

ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 40
ip hello-interval eigrp 1 30
ip hold-time eigrp 1 90
no shutdown
interface s0/0/1
description Serial Link to R3
bandwidth 128

ip add 192.168.23.1 255.255.255.252

ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 40
ip hello-interval eigrp 1 30
ip hold-time eigrp 1 90
no shutdown

interface lo0

ip add 209.165.200.225 255.255.255.252

description Connection to ISP

router eigrp 1

router-id 2.2.2.2

network 192.168.2.0 0.0.0.255

network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0.3

network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3

passive-interface g0/0

ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 lo0

end

Router R3 Configuration:

conf t

hostname R3

Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced EIGRP

© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 6 of 9

enable secret class
no ip domain lookup
key chain EIGRP-KEYS
key 1
key-string Cisco123
line con 0
password cisco
login
logging synchronous
line vty 0 4
password cisco
login
banner motd @
Unauthorized Access is Prohibited! @

interface lo3

description Connection to Branch 33

ip add 172.16.33.1 255.255.255.0

interface lo4

description Connection to Branch 34

ip add 172.16.34.1 255.255.255.0

interface lo5

description Connection to Branch 35

ip add 172.16.35.1 255.255.255.0

interface lo6

description Connection to Branch 36

ip add 172.16.36.1 255.255.255.0

interface g0/0

description R3 LAN Connection

ip add 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0

no shutdown
interface s0/0/0
description Serial Link to R1

ip add 192.168.13.2 255.255.255.252

ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP-KEYS
ip hello-interval eigrp 1 30
ip hold-time eigrp 1 90
clock rate 128000
bandwidth 128
no shutdown
interface s0/0/1
description Serial Link to R2
bandwidth 128

ip add 192.168.23.2 255.255.255.252

ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5

Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced EIGRP

© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 7 of 9

ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 eigrp-keys

! ip bandwidth-percent eigrp 1 40

ip hello-interval eigrp 1 30
ip hold-time eigrp 1 90
no shutdown
router eigrp 1

router-id 3.3.3.3

network 192.168.3.0 0.0.0.255

network 192.168.13.0 0.0.0.3
network 192.168.23.0 0.0.0.3
network 172.16.0.0 0.0.255.255
passive-interface g0/0
auto-summary
end

Step 4: Verify end-to-end connectivity.

Note: It may be necessary to disable the PC firewall to ping between PCs.

Step 5: Save the configuration on all routers.

Part 2: Troubleshoot EIGRP

In Part 2, verify that all routers have established neighbor adjacencies, and that all network routes are
available.

Additional EIGRP Requirements:

 All serial interface clock rates should be set at 128 Kb/s and a matching bandwidth setting should be

available to allow EIGRP cost metrics to be calculated correctly.

 Manual route summarization of the branch networks, simulated by using Loopback interfaces on R1 and

R3, should be utilized. The automatic summarization feature of EIGRP should not be used.

 EIGRP should redistribute the static default route to the Internet. This is simulated by using Loopback

interface 0 on R2.

 EIGRP should be configured to use no more than 40 percent of the available bandwidth on the serial

interfaces.

 EIGRP Hello/Hold timer intervals should be set to 30/90 on all serial interfaces.

 All serial interfaces should be configured with MD5 authentication, using key chain EIGRP-KEYS, with a

key-string of Cisco123.

List the commands used during your EIGRP troubleshooting process:

Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced EIGRP

© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 8 of 9

List the changes made to resolve the EIGRP issues. If no problems were found on the device, then respond
with “no problems were found”.

R1 Router:

R2 Router:

R3 Router:

Reflection

1. How can the auto-summary command create routing issues in EIGRP?

2. What advantages are provided by manually summarizing the branch routes (loopback interfaces on R1 and
R3) in this network?

3. Why would you want to change the EIGRP Hello and Hold time intervals on an interface?

Lab – Troubleshooting Advanced EIGRP

© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 9 of 9

Router Interface Summary Table

Router Interface Summary

Router Model Ethernet Interface #1 Ethernet Interface #2 Serial Interface #1 Serial Interface #2

1800 Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)

Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

1900 Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)

Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)

Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

2801 Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)

Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0) Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)

2811 Fast Ethernet 0/0
(F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1
(F0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

2900 Gigabit Ethernet 0/0
(G0/0)

Gigabit Ethernet 0/1
(G0/1)
Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many
interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router
class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device.
The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An
example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be
used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.

TextField1:

©

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© 2013 Cisco and

Lab – Co

Topology

Addressing

D

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Objectives

Part 1: Co

 Cable

 Config

 Config

Part

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    Lab – Configuring a Switch Management Address

    © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 2 of 8

     1 PC (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)

     Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices

    via the

    console ports

     Ethernet cables as shown in the topology

    Part 1: Configure a Basic Network Device

    In Part 1, you will set up the network and configure basic settings, such as hostnames, interface IP
    addresses, and passwords.

    Step 1: Cable the network.

    a. Cable the network as shown in the topology.

    b. Establish a console connection to the switch from PC-A.

    Step 2: Configure basic switch settings.

    In this step, you will configure basic switch settings, such as hostname and configuring an IP address for the
    SVI. Assigning an IP address on the switch is only the first step. As the network administrator, you must
    specify how the switch will be managed. Telnet and Secure Shell (SSH) are two of the most common
    management methods; however, Telnet is a very insecure protocol. All information flowing between the two
    devices is sent in plain text. Passwords and other sensitive information can be easily looked at if captured by
    a packet sniffer.

    a. Assuming the switch had no configuration file stored in nonvolatile random-access memory (NVRAM),
    you will be at the user EXEC mode prompt on the switch with a prompt of Switch>. Enter privileged
    EXEC mode.

    Switch> enable

    Switch#

    b. Verify a clean configuration file with the show running-config privileged EXEC command. If a
    configuration file was previously saved, it will have to be removed. Depending on the switch model and
    IOS version, your configuration may look slightly different. However, there should be no configured
    passwords or IP address set. If your switch does not have a default configuration, ask your instructor for
    help.

    c. Enter global configuration mode and assign the switch hostname.

    Switch# configure terminal

    Switch(config)#

    hostname S1

    S1(config)#

    d. Configure the switch password access.

    S1(config)# enable secret class

    S1(config)#

    e. Prevent unwanted Domain Name System (DNS) lookups.

    S1(config)#

    no ip domain-lookup

    S1(config)#

    f. Configure a login message-of-the-day (MOTD) banner.

    S1(config)# banner motd #

    Enter Text message. End with the character ‘#’.
    Unauthorized access is strictly prohibited. #

    Lab – Configuring a Switch Management Address

    © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 3 of 8

    g. Verify your access setting by moving between modes.

    S1(config)# exit

    S1#

    S1# exit

    Unauthorized access is strictly prohibited.

    S1>

    What shortcut keys are used to go directly from global configuration mode to privileged EXEC mode?

    h. Return to privileged EXEC mode from user EXEC mode.

    S1> enable

    Password: class

    S1#

    Note: Password will not show up on screen when entering.

    i. Enter global configuration mode to set the SVI IP address to allow remote switch management.

    S1# config t

    S1#(config)# interface vlan 1

    S1(config-if)#

    ip address 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0

    S1(config-if)# no shut

    S1(config-if)# exit

    S1(config)#

    j. Restrict console port access. The default configuration is to allow all console connections with no
    password needed.

    S1(config)#

    line con 0

    S1(config-line)#

    password cisco

    S1(config-line)#

    login

    S1(config-line)# exit

    S1(config)#

    k. Configure the virtual terminal (VTY) line for the switch to allow Telnet access. If you do not configure a
    VTY password, you will not be able to Telnet to the switch.

    S1(config)#

    line vty 0 4

    S1(config-line)# password cisco
    S1(config-line)# login

    S1(config-line)#

    end

    S1#

    *Mar 1 00:06:11.590: %SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console by console

    Lab – Configuring a Switch Management Address

    © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 4 of 8

    Step 3: Configure an IP address on PC-A.

    a. Assign the IP address and subnet mask to the PC, as shown in the Addressing Table on page 1. The
    procedure for assigning an IP address on a PC running Windows 7 is described below:

    1) Click the Windows Start icon > Control Panel.

    2) Click View By: > Category.

    3) Choose View network status and tasks > Change adapter settings.

    4) Right-click Local Area Network Connection and select Properties.

    5) Choose Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4), click Properties > OK.

    6) Click the Use the following IP address radio button and enter the IP address and subnet mask.

    Part 2: Verify and Test Network Connectivity

    You will now verify and document the switch configuration, test end-to-end connectivity between PC-A and
    S1, and test the remote management capability of the switch.

    Step 1: Display the S1 device configuration.

    a. Return to your console connection using Tera Term on PC-A to display and verify your switch
    configuration by issuing the show run command. A sample configuration is shown below. The settings
    you configured are highlighted in yellow. The other configuration settings are IOS defaults.

    S1# show run
    Building configuration.

    ..

    Current configuration : 1508 bytes

    !

    ! Last configuration change at 00:06:11 UTC Mon Mar 1 1993

    !

    version 15.0

    no service pad

    service timestamps debug datetime msec

    service timestamps log datetime msec

    no service password-encryption

    !
    hostname S1
    !

    boot-start-marker

    boot-end-marker

    !

    enable secret 4 06YFDUHH61wAE/kLkDq9BGho1QM5EnRtoyr8cHAUg.

    2

    !

    no aaa new-model

    system mtu routing 1500

    !
    !
    no ip domain-lookup
    !

    spanning-tree mode pvst

    Lab – Configuring a Switch Management Address

    © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 5 of 8

    spanning-tree extend system-id

    !

    vlan internal allocation policy ascending

    !
    !

    interface FastEthernet0/1

    !

    interface FastEthernet0/2

    interface FastEthernet0/24

    !

    interface GigabitEthernet0/1

    !

    interface GigabitEthernet0/2

    !

    interface Vlan1

    ip address 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0
    !

    ip http server

    ip http secure-server

    !

    banner motd ^C

    Unauthorized access is strictly prohibited. ^C

    !
    line con 0
    password cisco
    login
    line vty 0 4
    password cisco
    login

    line vty 5 15

    login
    !
    end

    b. Verify the status of your SVI management interface. Your VLAN 1 interface should be up/up and have an
    IP address assigned. Notice that switch port F0/6 is also up because PC-A is connected to it. Because all
    switch ports are initially in VLAN 1, by default, you can communicate with the switch using the IP address
    you configured for VLAN 1.

    S1# show ip interface brief
    Interface IP-Address OK? Method Status Protocol

    Vlan1 192.168.1.2 YES manual up up

    FastEthernet0/1 unassigned YES unset down down

    FastEthernet0/2 unassigned YES unset down down

    FastEthernet0/3 unassigned YES unset down down

    FastEthernet0/4 unassigned YES unset down down

    FastEthernet0/5 unassigned YES unset down down

    FastEthernet0/6 unassigned YES unset up up

    L
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