eassy

 

Theory/concept 3: Hofstede Power Distance 

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
eassy
Just from $13/Page
Order Essay

Example 1: Both have power distance 

Example 2: U.S. Federal Communication Commission 

Example 3: French President;Power belongs to the people  

Resources Links:

Net Neutrality & How It Impacts Your Business

https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbestechcouncil/2017/12/08/the-impact-of-net-neutrality-laws-on-your-business/#2bd5c7a13662

https://hackernoon.com/net-neutrality-what-it-is-why-it-matters-and-how-it-affects-the-u-s-97ad7ecf1d98

1st Theory: Task vs Social Orientation

· What are the dominant values in our society that led to the net neutrality repeal?

· Are we assertive or nurturing? (Self-serving or belief in helping others)

· Which one are we choosing? Task or Social

2nd Theory: Individualism vs Collectivism

· Is our society as a whole individualist or collective?

3rd Theory: Uncertainty Avoidance

·

Uncertainty Avoidance

Introduction:

 

Theory/concept 1: Economic and Political Interdependence

Example 1: Political- How U.S always wants to be superior 

Example 2: Political- everyone is treated the same in French, Yellow Vest Movement 

Example 3: Economic-Rich get richer poor get poorer 

As one knows, interdependence means that something depends on more than one thing or person. Politically and economically speaking, countries can depend on or gain ideas from each other through effective communication. At other times, countries differ than others and are not dependent policy or economically wise. Being that Net neutrality is the main topic, one can see a big difference in policies based on countries such as France and the United States. While the United States is in the process of slowly getting rid of Net Neutrality, France is progressing in enforcing it. In the first example, the political aspect will be discussed on the United State’s liking of remaining in power whether it is through politics or economics. Through capitalism, the U.S. sees this as a big advantage for businesses all across the country because it means that the companies will be making more money. A majority can associate more money with power. With Net Neutrality, the U.S. clearly visualizes a market for companies to make money by charging what they like for the services which can be seen as good and bad for consumers. Some might feel this is unfair and caters to wealthy customers while others feel that it gives opportunities for smaller companies. France is using their best efforts to try and give equal access to all users because they see it as a right rather than a necessity. Through these different viewpoints, one can see how countries value certain topics differently. 

Theory/concept 2: Ethnocentrism

Ethnocentrism is defined as judging another culture and believing that the values and standards of one’s own culture are superior especially in regard to language, behavior, customs, and religion. Every person has their own cultural values which can influence on what is considered right or wrong. This leads to certain cultures believing that their beliefs and perspectives are superior to others. Ethnocentrism can have a positive and negative attitudes in cultures. Positive attitude towards one’s own ethnic/cultural group and a negative attitude towards other ethnic/cultural groups. It’s a debate whether ethnocentrism is reasonable or unreasonable mostly because it doesn’t have much rational when it comes to making a decision rather than I think my way is right just because of how someone’s culture perspective. This plays a part on the net neutrality issue and what exactly France thinks is right compared to the US and what they think is right, especially since they have very distinct cultures. (George) America and European countries like France practice different in many aspects. One of these aspects is net neutrality. Net neutrality is the principle that an internet service provider (ISP) has to provide access to all sites content and application at the same speed, under the same condition without blocking or preferencing any content. Many consumer groups and tech support net neutrality because many of them argued that without net neutrality we could lose access to free and open internet. One big fear is that smaller companies and startups will not have the same opportunities to grow if internet service providers can pick and choose companies and services to favor in what is called “paid prioritization.” Compared to the United States, France operates things complete opposite. France has a reasonable restriction on any explicit content online that involves children or minors. Material that can be viewed and considered as terrorist propaganda is also halted by internet service providers.

 Verizon says about Net Neutrality:It does not want the internet to be treated as a utility, in spite of how important access to the internet is of tens of millions of people to find jobs, get an education and connect with the community.

AT&T says about Net Neutrality:A page on AT&T’s website states in large letters “We support an open internet.” that seems to be in support of net neutrality.

Comcast says about Net Neutrality:Comcast says it loves net neutrality. Comcast customers will continue to enjoy all of the benefits of an open internet today, tomorrow and in the future.  

Example 1: What U.S. Thinks 

Example 2: What French Thinks

Example 3: 

Theory/concept 3: Hofstede Power Distance 

Example 1: Both have power distance 

Example 2: U.S. Federal Communication Commission 

Example 3: French President;Power belongs to the people 

Conclusion: 

 

Resources Links:

https://www.mondo.com/blog

net

neutrality

impacts

businesses/

https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbestechcouncil/2017/12/08/the

impact

of

net

neutrality

laws

on

your

business/#2b
d5c7a13662

https://hackernoon.com/net

neutrality

what

it

is

why

it

matters

and

how

it

affects

the

u

s

97ad7ecf1d98

1st Theory: Task vs

Social Orientation

·

What are the dominant values in our society that led to the net neutrality
repeal?

·

Are we assertive or nurturing? (Self

serving or belief in helping others)

·

Which one are we choosing? Task or Social

2nd Theory: Individualism vs Collectivism

·

Is our society as a whole individualist or collective?

3rd Theory: Uncertainty Avoidance

·

https://clearly
cultural.com/geert

hofstede

cultural

dimensions/uncertainty

avoidance

index/

Introduction:

Theory/concept 1:

Economic and Political Interdependence

Example 1:

Political

How U.S always wants to be superior

Example 2:

Political

everyone is treated the same in French, Yellow Vest
Movement

Example 3
: Economic

Rich get richer poor get poorer

As one knows, interdependence means that something depends on more
than

one thing or person. Politically and economically speaking, countries can
depend on or gain ideas from each other through effective communication. At other
times, countries differ than others and are not dependent policy or economically wise.
Being that N
et neutrality is the main topic, one can see a big difference in policies
based on countries such as France and the United States. While the United States is
Resources Links:

Net Neutrality & How It Impacts Your Business

https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbestechcouncil/2017/12/08/the-impact-of-net-
neutrality-laws-on-your-business/#2bd5c7a13662

https://hackernoon.com/net-neutrality-what-it-is-why-it-matters-and-how-it-affects-the-
u-s-97ad7ecf1d98
1st Theory: Task vs Social Orientation
 What are the dominant values in our society that led to the net neutrality
repeal?
 Are we assertive or nurturing? (Self-serving or belief in helping others)
 Which one are we choosing? Task or Social

2nd Theory: Individualism vs Collectivism
 Is our society as a whole individualist or collective?

3rd Theory: Uncertainty Avoidance
 https://clearlycultural.com/geert-hofstede-cultural-dimensions/uncertainty-
avoidance-index/

Introduction:

Theory/concept 1: Economic and Political Interdependence
Example 1: Political- How U.S always wants to be superior
Example 2: Political- everyone is treated the same in French, Yellow Vest
Movement
Example 3: Economic-Rich get richer poor get poorer
As one knows, interdependence means that something depends on more
than one thing or person. Politically and economically speaking, countries can
depend on or gain ideas from each other through effective communication. At other
times, countries differ than others and are not dependent policy or economically wise.
Being that Net neutrality is the main topic, one can see a big difference in policies
based on countries such as France and the United States. While the United States is

Chapter Eleven
Intercultural Communication and the Organization

Chapter Objectives
Explain why intercultural communication is essential for organizational success and communication.
Describe what is meant by culture in intercultural communication.
Identify barriers to effective intercultural communication.
Identify steps that can be used to overcome these barriers.
Discuss the Hofstede dimensions as they apply to organizational contexts.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Reasons to Study Intercultural Communication
We are a global village.
Information is readily available anywhere on earth.
The workplace is more diverse than ever before.
We must be able to interact with others here and abroad efficiently and appropriately.
Bottom line: Effective intercultural communication has become essential.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Three Reasons Effective Intercultural Communication is Essential
Mobility.
Time and distance are no longer factors in communication.
Economic and political interdependence.
The world’s markets and global concerns are dependent on effective communication.
Communication Technology
Increased technology has allowed us freedoms to communicate quickly, efficiently, and cheaply.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Defining Culture
Multiple perspectives are apparent in all of the following categories
Norms
Roles
Belief Systems
Values
Laws
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©
Culture refers to the multiple perspectives a group has on the world and worldly phenomena.

Defining Culture
Culture is learned, not biologically transmitted. Enculturation occurs through:
Language
Nonverbal messages
Space and time orientation
Patterns for thinking
Self-images
Aesthetics
Culture is also modified by exposure to other cultures, which is called acculturation.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©
(continued)

Intercultural Communication
Refers to communication exchanges between people whose cultural perceptions and symbols must be managed for effective communication.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Intercultural Communication
Some examples of intercultural communication include:
An African-American speaking to a Caucasian.
A Jew speaking to a Muslim
A Cajun speaking to a Californian
A man communicating to a woman
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Barriers to Effective Intercultural Communication
Perceptual disparity
Selective perceptions may lead to confusing or conflicting opinions.
What is taken for granted behavior in one culture could be considered disrespectful in another.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Barriers to Effective Intercultural Communication
Ethnocentrism
People tend to judge the behaviors of others based on their own cultural values that they believe are “right.”
An ethnocentric individual believes his or her ethnicity or ethnic perspective is superior to others.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Barriers to Effective Intercultural Communication
Language dissimilarity
Some researchers suggest that language shapes reality.
Slang, jargon, and other language barriers can impact message reception and understanding.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©
(continued)

Barriers to Effective Intercultural Communication
Nonverbal dissimilarity
Gestures, emblems, and other nonverbal behaviors may be judged differently or have different meanings in different cultures.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©
(continued)

Approaches to Multinational Expansion
Multinational organizations can be structured in different ways towards the cultures they are expanding into.
Adler 5 structural orientations multinational organizations use
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Adler Structural Orientations of Multinational Organizations
Cultural dominance
Superimposing the culture to subsidiary offices.
Cultural accommodation
Attempting to accept and assume the cultural values of the host company.
Cultural compromise
Attempting to identify the divergent cultural orientations, but using only the similarities in the formation of policy.

Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Adler Structural Orientations of Multinational Organizations
Cultural avoidance
Pretending there are no differences between cultures.
Cultural synergy
A synergistic approach.
Policies are not superimposed by the parent organization.
Values of both cultures are managed, effectively creating a new culture.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

The Hofstede Studies
Suggests that there are perceptual differences based on culture.
Implies that these perceptual differences can account for misunderstanding and intercultural tensions in organizational contexts.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

The Hofstede Studies
Hofstede surveyed 116,000 employees in 72 nations to see if perceptions about work and work processes varied according to country and culture.
Differences were categorized in four groups.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©
(continued)

The Hofstede Studies
Uncertainty avoidance
High uncertainty avoidance cultures
seek more clarity and
less abstraction.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©
(continued)

The Hofstede Studies
Power distance
Employees in high power distant cultures
respect superiors and
disdain those who challenge them.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©
(continued)

The Hofstede Studies
Individualism vs. Collectivism
Relates to whether persons in the group value
free-spirited independence, or
community cooperation and compromise.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©
(continued)

The Hofstede Studies
Task vs. Social Orientation
Pertains to whether the dominant values of the society emphasize assertiveness or nurture.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©
(continued)

Cultural Extremes
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©
Adapted from tables in Hofstede, Geert, Culture’s Consequences: Second Edition, Comparing Values, Behaviors, Instituations and Organizations Across Nations, Sage Publications, 2001, pp. 87, 151, 215, 286.

Suggestions for
Overcoming Barriers
Follow Prescriptions
Sometimes we have an idea about what to do, but find it hard to actually follow through.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Suggestions for
Overcoming Barriers
Learn about other cultures
Acquire multicultural competencies and skills including foreign languages.
Become students of worldwide human relations and values.
Think beyond local perceptions and transform stereotypes into positive views of people.
Become open and flexible in dealing with diversity.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Suggestions for
Overcoming Barriers
Recognize diversity within cultural groups.
People within cultures are also diverse.
Question stereotypes you have about people from a specific culture.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Suggestions for
Overcoming Barriers
Assume an egalitarian frame.
Be open to cultural differences.
Be aware of and question your own ethnocentric attitudes and beliefs.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Central Concepts
Because of the ease of travel, the pervasiveness of communication technology, and political/economic reliance on other countries,
it has become increasingly important to understand the effects of intercultural communication on organizational success.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Central Concepts
Organizational men and women need to examine the communication noises that affect intercultural interactions and
become dedicated to overcoming these obstacles when they communicate.

Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Chapter Eleven
Intercultural Communication and the Organization

Chapter Objectives
Explain why intercultural communication is essential for organizational success and communication.
Describe what is meant by culture in intercultural communication.
Identify barriers to effective intercultural communication.
Identify steps that can be used to overcome these barriers.
Discuss the Hofstede dimensions as they apply to organizational contexts.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Reasons to Study Intercultural Communication
We are a global village.
Information is readily available anywhere on earth.
The workplace is more diverse than ever before.
We must be able to interact with others here and abroad efficiently and appropriately.
Bottom line: Effective intercultural communication has become essential.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Three Reasons Effective Intercultural Communication is Essential
Mobility.
Time and distance are no longer factors in communication.
Economic and political interdependence.
The world’s markets and global concerns are dependent on effective communication.
Communication Technology
Increased technology has allowed us freedoms to communicate quickly, efficiently, and cheaply.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Defining Culture
Multiple perspectives are apparent in all of the following categories
Norms
Roles
Belief Systems
Values
Laws
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©
Culture refers to the multiple perspectives a group has on the world and worldly phenomena.

Defining Culture
Culture is learned, not biologically transmitted. Enculturation occurs through:
Language
Nonverbal messages
Space and time orientation
Patterns for thinking
Self-images
Aesthetics
Culture is also modified by exposure to other cultures, which is called acculturation.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©
(continued)

Intercultural Communication
Refers to communication exchanges between people whose cultural perceptions and symbols must be managed for effective communication.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Intercultural Communication
Some examples of intercultural communication include:
An African-American speaking to a Caucasian.
A Jew speaking to a Muslim
A Cajun speaking to a Californian
A man communicating to a woman
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Barriers to Effective Intercultural Communication
Perceptual disparity
Selective perceptions may lead to confusing or conflicting opinions.
What is taken for granted behavior in one culture could be considered disrespectful in another.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Barriers to Effective Intercultural Communication
Ethnocentrism
People tend to judge the behaviors of others based on their own cultural values that they believe are “right.”
An ethnocentric individual believes his or her ethnicity or ethnic perspective is superior to others.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Barriers to Effective Intercultural Communication
Language dissimilarity
Some researchers suggest that language shapes reality.
Slang, jargon, and other language barriers can impact message reception and understanding.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©
(continued)

Barriers to Effective Intercultural Communication
Nonverbal dissimilarity
Gestures, emblems, and other nonverbal behaviors may be judged differently or have different meanings in different cultures.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©
(continued)

Approaches to Multinational Expansion
Multinational organizations can be structured in different ways towards the cultures they are expanding into.
Adler 5 structural orientations multinational organizations use
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Adler Structural Orientations of Multinational Organizations
Cultural dominance
Superimposing the culture to subsidiary offices.
Cultural accommodation
Attempting to accept and assume the cultural values of the host company.
Cultural compromise
Attempting to identify the divergent cultural orientations, but using only the similarities in the formation of policy.

Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Adler Structural Orientations of Multinational Organizations
Cultural avoidance
Pretending there are no differences between cultures.
Cultural synergy
A synergistic approach.
Policies are not superimposed by the parent organization.
Values of both cultures are managed, effectively creating a new culture.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

The Hofstede Studies
Suggests that there are perceptual differences based on culture.
Implies that these perceptual differences can account for misunderstanding and intercultural tensions in organizational contexts.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

The Hofstede Studies
Hofstede surveyed 116,000 employees in 72 nations to see if perceptions about work and work processes varied according to country and culture.
Differences were categorized in four groups.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©
(continued)

The Hofstede Studies
Uncertainty avoidance
High uncertainty avoidance cultures
seek more clarity and
less abstraction.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©
(continued)

The Hofstede Studies
Power distance
Employees in high power distant cultures
respect superiors and
disdain those who challenge them.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©
(continued)

The Hofstede Studies
Individualism vs. Collectivism
Relates to whether persons in the group value
free-spirited independence, or
community cooperation and compromise.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©
(continued)

The Hofstede Studies
Task vs. Social Orientation
Pertains to whether the dominant values of the society emphasize assertiveness or nurture.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©
(continued)

Cultural Extremes
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©
Adapted from tables in Hofstede, Geert, Culture’s Consequences: Second Edition, Comparing Values, Behaviors, Instituations and Organizations Across Nations, Sage Publications, 2001, pp. 87, 151, 215, 286.

Suggestions for
Overcoming Barriers
Follow Prescriptions
Sometimes we have an idea about what to do, but find it hard to actually follow through.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Suggestions for
Overcoming Barriers
Learn about other cultures
Acquire multicultural competencies and skills including foreign languages.
Become students of worldwide human relations and values.
Think beyond local perceptions and transform stereotypes into positive views of people.
Become open and flexible in dealing with diversity.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Suggestions for
Overcoming Barriers
Recognize diversity within cultural groups.
People within cultures are also diverse.
Question stereotypes you have about people from a specific culture.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Suggestions for
Overcoming Barriers
Assume an egalitarian frame.
Be open to cultural differences.
Be aware of and question your own ethnocentric attitudes and beliefs.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Central Concepts
Because of the ease of travel, the pervasiveness of communication technology, and political/economic reliance on other countries,
it has become increasingly important to understand the effects of intercultural communication on organizational success.
Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Central Concepts
Organizational men and women need to examine the communication noises that affect intercultural interactions and
become dedicated to overcoming these obstacles when they communicate.

Organizational Communication: Foundations for Business and Management, 2e Thomson, 2006 ©

Calculator

Calculate the price of your paper

Total price:$26
Our features

We've got everything to become your favourite writing service

Need a better grade?
We've got you covered.

Order your paper