Comparing Humanistic-Existential Psychotherapy with Other Approaches

 Understanding the strengths of each type of therapy and which type of therapy is most appropriate for each patient is an essential skill of the psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioner. In this Assignment, you will compare humanistic-existential therapy to another psychotherapeutic approach. You will identify the strengths and challenges of each approach and describe expected potential outcomes. 

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1). ZERO (0) PLAGIARISM

2). AT LEAST 5 REFERENCES, NO MORE THAN 5 YEARS.

3). PLEASE SEE THE ATTACHED RUBRIC DETAILS, The Videos Links and transcripts, and assignment instruction

4) PLEASE FOLLOW THE APA 7 WRITING STYLE/FORMAT.

 

PLEASE SEE BELOW THE VIDEO TRANSCRIPTS AND THE LINKS. THANKS

FIRST Transcript: Theories of Counseling – Existential Therapy

VIDEO LINK: https://youtu.be/YvAvc2aWup0

TRANSCRIPT

Hello this is dr. Gandhi welcome to my

video on the theory of existential

therapy the term existential therapy

actually, refers to a group of several

therapies however generally under this

theory counselors focus on human

experiences as opposed to behavioral

rules or dividing the mind into

different areas as we see in

psychoanalytic and analytic therapy so

we’ll start with the theory of

personality and in existential therapy

an important part of the theory of

personality is the idea that there is an

inner struggle between the concepts of

freedom and responsibility and that

individuals move toward resolving the

struggle there’s also a search for

meaning and purpose in life as well as a

search to identify and establish values

individuals are thought of as self-aware

and the self-awareness plays a part in

human development the formation of

identity is a key component of

development as is building productive

and meaningful relationships in

existential therapy people work to self

actualize to become fully authentic to

become a fully authentic person in the

world and generally how a person relates

to the world is a key area of emphasis

when looking at existential therapy

under this theory there are several

fears that clients will have at

different points in their lives

including the fear of isolation

meaninglessness the fear of death

the fear of lacking any meaningful

relationships the fear of having and

experiencing guilt and also the fear of

feeling empty the fear of emptiness so

as you can see from this theory of

personality existential therapy really

focuses on what it means to exist in the

world and how individuals sometimes

struggle to make sense of that existence

and to find purpose in that existence

continuing with the theory of

personality the ways of being in the

world in the theory of existential

therapy is divided into four parts and

it’s important to understand that

existential counselors believe that

individuals exist in all four of these

parts all four of these worlds

simultaneously the first world here is

the eigen welt and that’s one’s own

world

it’s an individual’s subjective inner

experience of the world next, we have the

MIT welt and the MIT welt

represents relationships that only human

beings can have then we have the ohm

welt and the ohm welt are the physical

world and the objects in the physical

world so it’s the environment around an

individual including all living beings

and last, we have the uber welt and the

uber welt represents spiritual beliefs

about the individual’s ideal world, the

next item when looking at the theory of

personality is the concept of

existential anxiety and this are

different than what existential

counselors refer to as neurotic anxiety

and I’ll talk about those differences in

a moment

existential anxiety is considered normal

it’s to be expected and it’s also

considered in many ways to be positive

because it can lead to living a full and

authentic life individuals require

courage in order to overcome existential

anxiety but when Exxon’s existential

anxiety can be accepted by an individual

therapeutic change is possible

existential anxiety can also be avoided

at least for a short time when an

individual believes there is safety and

security and life existential counselors

do not believe in safety and security

but rather they have a view of the world

where uncertainty is a major factor that

must be accepted and acknowledged moving

on to the cause of symptoms and you can

see here under causes symptoms I have

existential anxiety that’s a cause of

clients’ symptoms under this theory and

neurotic anxiety and it’s important to

understand the difference between these

two types of anxiety existential

counsellors recognize both of these

types of anxiety exist but feel they

have very different characteristics so

taking a look at existential anxiety in

this theory existential anxiety is not

pathological it’s a normal part of the

human condition it’s appropriate to

situations individuals do not typically

repress existential anxiety and it cut

it can facilitate the confrontation of

what existential counselors refer to as

existential dilemmas

neurotic anxiety on the other hand is

inappropriate based on situation its

disproportional in severity as compared

to the situation it may be caused by

repressed fears and sometimes

existential issues can cause or

contribute to the development and

maintenance of neurotic anxiety so there

is a link between existential issues and

neurotic anxiety in some cases moving on

to techniques existential counselors do

not typically use traditional techniques

rather there is an emphasis on building

a genuine and empathetic relationship

with the client and in this relationship

the subjective experience about the

counselor and the client are realized

embraced and appreciated the counselor

works throughout the course of the

therapy to understand the client

experiences existential therapy is

mostly non directive and typically does

not make direct attempts to cause change

in a client existential counselor do

use self-disclosure as a therapeutic

technique they model authentic behavior

and this is an important point to look

at the modeling of authentic behavior

because this necessitates that an

existential counselor has explored

existential issues including accepting

existential anxiety and moving toward

self-actualization so counselors in

existential therapy needs to have

heightened self-awareness particularly

around existential issues

existential counselors note other ways

of being which is a little bit directive

but it’s not considered a direct attempt

to cause change and this pointing out to

the client that there are other ways of

being available to the client is

different than suggesting other ways of

behaving feeling or thinking

interestingly existential counselors do

recognize transference and when they

experience transference they pointed out

and make it a topic of discussion

existential counselors believe in the

concept of resistance and they believe

the resistance comes about when clients

do not take responsibility when clients

are not aware of feelings when they are

not authentic and existential counselors

will often address indirectly resistance

when they experience it in a counseling

session now let’s take a look at the

goals in existential therapy and not

surprisingly one of the goals is

authenticity and specifically a high

level of authenticity consistent with

self-actualization another goal is for

the client to find purpose and meaning

in life counselors hope to increase

awareness about the choices available to

an individual and the freedom to make

those choices there is a hope that

through the counseling process a better

understanding of the client by

themselves is achieved and also a better

understanding of client values

another goal is that clients will

develop improved communication skills

which would allow more authentic genuine

and productive relationships with other

people existential counselors help

clients to take responsibility for

decisions and help them to exhibit

greater honesty with themselves in their

own lives in their own experience moving

on to my opinion regarding existential

therapy and how we can integrate

elements of this theory into our own

counseling style before getting into

these items and discussing these items

it’s important to recognize that unlike

many of the other theories that can be

traced back to one individual one

developer of the theory there are a

number of individuals that contribute to

existential therapy and there are a

number of existential therapies there

are many versions of this theory of

existential therapy all of the items I

have pointed out here as items that can

potentially be integrated into a

counseling style are found in most if

not all of the existential therapy

versions however some might emphasize

different items more than others the

first item here is the emphasis on

finding meaning and purpose in life and

I particularly like this feature this

component of existential therapy

oftentimes clients come into counseling

sessions and to some extent or another

finding meaning and purpose in life is

something that will be discussed and

existential therapy tackles this issue

in an authentic way and it tackles it

head-on it makes it a foe

because of the therapy and this is

similar to my second item the

willingness to address profound issues

so in general not just the meaning and

purpose of life but also other profound

issues existential therapy is willing to

directly discuss these issues it does

not try to avoid profound existential

issues rather it moves directly toward

them in the counseling process the third

item I have here is authenticity and

this is a component of many theories of

counseling and in those theories of

counseling oftentimes and definitely in

the case of existential therapy the

existential counsellor is expected to be

authentic by having good self-awareness

and by having directly addressed

existential issues themselves I find

this to be an important point next, we

have the therapeutic alliance the

therapeutic alliance and existential

therapy is similar to the therapeutic

alliance we see in person-centered

therapy and for that matter and many of

the theories of counseling the next item

is the focus on the present but a

willingness to explore the past and

discuss the future so some theories of

counseling focus on the present really

to the exclusion of the past and the

future

they really just try to stay in the

moment in the counseling session and not

deviate and talk about the past or what

could happen the future and that can be

useful but that can also be restrictive

so I really like the way existential

therapy is willing to stay in the

present but also willing to look at how

past experiences affect the client and

the direction the client may want to

take in the future

and concerns they may have about the

future the next item here is the

appreciation and existential counseling

that’s some anxiety what they refer to

as existential anxiety is normal and

expected existential therapy does not

pathologize existential anxiety and it

allows a counselor to work with a client

with this understanding that some

anxiety will be present and that that’s

okay and the last item I have in terms

of items I like about existential

therapy is this focus on improving

communication this isn’t necessarily a

large part of many of the existential

therapies but it is a part of many and

considering how important relationships

are for many clients improving

communication has potential positive

impact in a wide variety of areas career

family friendships all these benefit

from improving communication skills and

improving the ability to authentically

communicate in terms of some of the

criticisms I have of existential therapy

and some of the areas of and items of

this theory that I do not think are

particularly useful or at least not easy

to integrate into a counseling style are

always productive to integrate into a

counseling style I think a major

criticism is really the absence of

concrete techniques there is an emphasis

on the therapeutic alliance I mentioned

that I think that’s good

however, this theory is mostly non

directive and I believe that many times

non directive is productive and useful

but just as in person-centered therapy

being non-directive can also be

restrictive and sometimes frustrating

for the client existential therapy is

not as non-directive as person-centered

therapy but the idea of being

non-directive is still an important

theoretical construct in this theory so

to summarize the utility or my opinion

of the utility of existential therapy

this therapy is willing to take on

serious issues it has an emphasis on the

therapeutic alliance and authenticity

it’s willing to discuss what the client

wants to discuss it normalizes

experiences of anxiety and improves

communication but it does not have a

large number of well-developed

techniques and is mostly non directive I

hope you found this video on the theory

of existential therapy to be useful as

always if you have any questions or

concerns feel free to contact me I’ll be

happy to assist you

SECOND TRANSCRIPT: James Bugental Live Case Consultation Psychotherapy Video

VIDEO LINK: https://youtu.be/Zl8tVTjdocI

you

he came in really his main issue that he

speaks about is he just doesn’t feel

very alive in his lung and he’s been in

therapy before I think the last time was

about two years ago and he got in touch

with some anger but the sense of kind of

he he doesn’t quite get a feeling about

what he’s feeling he has a difficult

time with that and he feels constricted

he feels constricted in his life I hear

that same constriction doesn’t almost

yeah, your hand gestures are very

constricted yeah yeah that’s kind of how

he presents I think yeah that’s that’s

kind of how he presents himself

maybe if I if sort of I play him a

little bit there’s my name make good

point Joe

but we weren’t gonna always often we’d

get a call six weeks a couple months

later and what what’s happening and

they’d say there’s a crack in my

driveway so we’d have to go back and see

what I was cooking there and sure enough

fielder the cracks and if you look down

in them very often you’d see a little

green flag waving a little green flag

that represented life that had gone

through the compacted earth the salt the

hot asphalt the tremendous pressure of

the roller coming up breaking through

many years later now did some programs

up in just north of just Jasper National

Park in Alberta Canada and driving back

down the Icefields highway there’s a

place where you pass a wall of sheared

granite it’s messy massive it just gives

you such an impression of society its

Olympian strength and if you stop and

you get out there’s a deflation get a

drink of water there and take pictures

and so on and then you go look closely and

in that massive granite face a crack and

in the crack that same rule green flag

waving to buy it that’s life that’s the

life force seeking searching out a way

to get to the Sun and when a client

comes into our office and we begin to

work that client is searching – just

like that that life force that we saw in

the cracks and the asphalt are granite

all life is expressed through the life

force is a life force searching is the

life force in action

and when that client who comes into your

office begins to say I hurt too much or

I once and I can’t seem to get what I

really want I don’t feel I feel unhappy

or incomplete or frustrated that’s that

little leaf trying to find its way to

the Sun to fulfillment

you

THIRD TRANSCRIPT: James Bugental: Humanistic Psychotherapy (excerpt) — A Thinking Allowed DVD w/ Jeffrey Mishlove

VIDEO LINK: https://youtu.be/mjDNKGIvWPQ

TRANSCRIPT

people sometimes say how can you stand

to listen to so much unhappiness and

pain and the answer is that that isn’t

all I hear I also hear curry and joy and

and growth

so they’re both sides to them and is

there a sense that with your clients and

I should think also with yourself that

one can’t really quite get to the joy

without going through a lot of the pain

that’s that’s very true when so long as

we’re denying our experience happy or

sad the other part is being denied to so

that we laugh without the full laugh we

weep without the pull fearless it’s only

as we open, I’m making this – either/or I

don’t like what I’m hearing myself

saying because it’s a matter of a

movement in the direction of greater

fullness of a being not something you

turn a switch now I’m really authentic

oh my god and to help someone else

get more in touch with their genuine

experiences to call them themself to be

there – don’t you then do it like to a

rafter I’ll call you sophomore you

you’ve written about therapy is

basically, a long-term process you’re

you’re not a therapist who sort of

patches up things or gives people

counseling for short-term problems it

really helps people to go through the

many layers of the onion to reach deeper

in and deeper into themselves and in

that process discover a larger and

larger sense of themselves one of the

things that you describe is we get deep

deep inside the south beyond some of the

superficial resistances within some

people is just an enormous level of

loathing and self-hatred mm-hmm it’s the

sort of thing which said despite

yourself yeah you’ve described so

eloquently in one of your books is is

the kind of thing that if

not handle therapeutically may lead a

person to run amok and it happens from

time to time deed show you know the let

me back up a little bit to comment on

what you’re saying we have to create a

self a definition of Who I am

we created the condition of what the

world is different people create

different world definitions and self

definitions that’s not a surprising

today’s it was at one time because with

television and other sources helped us

see how different it would be if we were

born in in Hong Kong or in goguma ganda

or something we know there are different

world views and ways of constructing who

and what I am and what this world is but

the work of depth therapy inevitably

leads us to question the way we’ve

constructed the world and defined who we

are in other words you’re getting

beneath the level of social conditioning

exactly so yeah and as that questioning

comes it’s very much like feeling the

ground is shaking under you you’re

questioning the ground you’re standing

on and it’s a very frightening

experience and in the spiritual

traditions it’s referred to often as the

leap of faith or the dark night of the

soul in our work we think that is

existential crisis the crisis of

existence and when we come to really

question to realize how arbitrary in a

sense is the way we’ve defined our own

identities and our world then come that

period of a panic sometimes and fright

if there’s not a therapeutic container

and someone gets to that point there’s a

feeling of desperation of impotence, the

Sartre describes it in the the nausea

that nausea of finding the arbitrariness

of things now and then when feeling

helpless to change that helpless to find

something that will rescue one from

nausea people can run amuck

Understanding the strengths of each type of therapy and which type of therapy is most appropriate for each patient is an essential skill of the psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioner. In this Assignment, you will compare humanistic-existential therapy to another psychotherapeutic approach. You will identify the strengths and challenges of each approach and describe expected potential outcomes.

To prepare:

· Review the humanistic-existential psychotherapy videos in this week’s Learning Resources.

· Reflect on humanistic-existential psychotherapeutic approaches.

· Then, select another psychotherapeutic approach to compare with humanistic-existential psychotherapy. The approach you choose may be one you previously explored in the course or one you are familiar with and especially interested in. 

The Assignment

In a 2- to 3-page paper, address the following:

· Briefly describe humanistic-existential psychotherapy and the second approach you selected. 

· Explain at least three differences between these therapies. Include how these differences might impact your practice as a PMHNP.

· Focusing on one video you viewed, explain why humanistic-existential psychotherapy was utilized with the patient in the video and why it was the treatment of choice. Describe the expected potential outcome if the second approach had been used with the patient. 

· Support your response with specific examples from this week’s media and at least three peer-reviewed, evidence-based sources. Explain why each of your supporting sources is considered scholarly. Attach the PDFs of your sources.

Rubric Detail

Select Grid View or List View to change the rubric’s layout.

Content

Name:

 

NRNP_6645_Week7_Assignment_Rubric

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Develop a 2- to 3-page paper comparing humanistic-existential therapy to another psychotherapeutic approach of your choice. Be sure to address the following:
·  Briefly describe humanistic-existential psychotherapy and the second approach you selected.

·   Explain at least three differences between humanistic-existential psychotherapy and the approach you selected.
·   Include how these differences might impact your practice as a PMHNP.

·   Explain why humanistic-existential psychotherapy was utilized with the client in the video and why it was the treatment of choice.
·   Describe the expected potential outcome if the second approach had been used with the client.
·   Support your response with at least three peer-reviewed, evidence-based sources from the literature. PDFs are attached.

Written Expression and Formatting – Paragraph Development and Organization:
Paragraphs make clear points that support well-developed ideas, flow logically, and demonstrate continuity of ideas. Sentences are carefully focused—neither long and rambling nor short and lacking substance. A clear and comprehensive purpose statement and introduction is provided which delineates all required criteria.

Written Expression and Formatting – English writing standards:
Correct grammar, mechanics, and proper punctuation

Points:

Points Range:
4 (4%) – 4 (4%)

Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity 80% of the time.

Purpose, introduction, and conclusion of the assignment are stated, yet are brief and not descriptive.

Feedback:

Written Expression and Formatting – The paper follows correct APA format for title page, headings, font, spacing, margins, indentations, page numbers, parenthetical/in-text citations, and reference list.

Excellent
90%–100%
Good
80%–89%
Fair
70%–79%
Poor
0%–69%

Points:

Points Range:
23 (23%) – 25 (25%)

The response includes an accurate and concise description of humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach.

Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
20 (20%) – 22 (22%)

The response includes a description of humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach.

Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
18 (18%) – 19 (19%)

The response includes a somewhat vague or inaccurate description of humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach.

Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
0 (0%) – 17 (17%)

The response includes a vague and inaccurate description of humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach, or is missing.

Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
23 (23%) – 25 (25%)

The response includes an accurate and clear explanation of three differences between humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach.
The response includes a thoughtful and throrough explanation of how the differences between humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach might impact your practice as a PMHNP.

Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
20 (20%) – 22 (22%)

The response includes an accurate explanation of three differences between humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach.

The response includes an explanation of how the differences between humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach might impact your practice as a PMHNP.

Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
18 (18%) – 19 (19%)

The response includes a somehwat vague or inaccurate explanation of three differences between humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach.

The response includes a somewhat vague or inaccurate explanation of how the differences between humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach might impact your practice as a PMHNP.

Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
0 (0%) – 17 (17%)

The response includes a vague and inaccurate explanation of three differences between humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach, or is missing.

The response includes a vague and inaccurate explanation of how the differences between humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach might impact your practice as a PMHNP, or is missing.

Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
32 (32%) – 35 (35%)

The response includes a thorough and accurate explanation of why humanistic-existential psychotherapy was utilized with the client and why it was the treatment of choice.
The response includes a thorough and accurate description of the expected potential outcome had the second approach been used with the client.
The response is supported by at least three peer-reviewed, evidence-based sources from the literature that provide strong support for the rationale provided. PDFs are attached.

Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
28 (28%) – 31 (31%)

The response includes an accurate explanation of why humanistic-existential psychotherapy was utilized with the client and why it was the treatment of choice.

The response includes a description of the expected potential outcome had the second approach been used with the client.

The response is supported by three peer-reviewed, evidence-based sources from the literature that provide appropriate support for the rationale provided. PDFs are attached.

Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
24 (24%) – 27 (27%)

The response includes a somewhat vague or incomplete explanation of why humanistic-existential psychotherapy was utilized with the client and why it was the treatment of choice.

The response includes a somewhat vague or incomplete description of the expected potential outcome had the second approach been used with the client.

The response is supported by two or three peer-reviewed, evidence-based sources from the literature. Resources selected may provide only weak support for the rationale provided. PDFs may not be attached.

Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
0 (0%) – 23 (23%)

The response includes a vague and inaccurate explanation of why humanistic-existential psychotherapy was utilized with the client and why it was the treatment of choice, or is missing.

The response includes a vauge and incomplete description of the expected potential outcome had the second approach been used with the client, or is missing.

The response is supported by vague or inaccurate evidence from the literature, or is missing.

Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)

Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity.
A clear and comprehensive purpose statement, introduction, and conclusion are provided that delineates all required criteria.

Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
4 (4%) – 4 (4%)

Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity 80% of the time.

Purpose, introduction, and conclusion of the assignment are stated, yet are brief and not descriptive.

Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)

Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity 60%–79% of the time.

Purpose, introduction, and conclusion of the assignment are vague or off topic.

Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
0 (0%) – 3 (3%)

Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity < 60% of the time. No purpose statement, introduction, or conclusion were provided. Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)

Uses correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation with no errors.

Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)

Contains 3 or 4 grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors.

Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
0 (0%) – 3 (3%)

Contains many (≥ 5) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors that interfere with the reader’s understanding.

Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)

Uses correct APA format with no errors.

Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
4 (4%) – 4 (4%)

Contains 1 or 2 APA format errors.

Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)

Contains 3 or 4 APA format errors.

Feedback:

Points:

Points Range:
0 (0%) – 3 (3%)

Contains many (≥ 5) APA format errors.

Feedback:

Show Descriptions

Show Feedback

Develop a 2- to 3-page paper comparing humanistic-existential therapy to another psychotherapeutic approach of your choice. Be sure to address the following:
·  Briefly describe humanistic-existential psychotherapy and the second approach you selected.–

Levels of Achievement:

Excellent
90%–100%
23 (23%) – 25 (25%)

The response includes an accurate and concise description of humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach.

Good
80%–89%
20 (20%) – 22 (22%)

The response includes a description of humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach.

Fair
70%–79%
18 (18%) – 19 (19%)

The response includes a somewhat vague or inaccurate description of humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach.

Poor
0%–69%
0 (0%) – 17 (17%)

The response includes a vague and inaccurate description of humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach, or is missing.

Feedback:

·   Explain at least three differences between humanistic-existential psychotherapy and the approach you selected.
·   Include how these differences might impact your practice as a PMHNP.–

Levels of Achievement:

Excellent
90%–100%
23 (23%) – 25 (25%)

The response includes an accurate and clear explanation of three differences between humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach.
The response includes a thoughtful and throrough explanation of how the differences between humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach might impact your practice as a PMHNP.

Good
80%–89%
20 (20%) – 22 (22%)

The response includes an accurate explanation of three differences between humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach.

The response includes an explanation of how the differences between humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach might impact your practice as a PMHNP.

Fair
70%–79%
18 (18%) – 19 (19%)

The response includes a somehwat vague or inaccurate explanation of three differences between humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach.

The response includes a somewhat vague or inaccurate explanation of how the differences between humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach might impact your practice as a PMHNP.

Poor
0%–69%
0 (0%) – 17 (17%)

The response includes a vague and inaccurate explanation of three differences between humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach, or is missing.

The response includes a vague and inaccurate explanation of how the differences between humanistic-existential psychotherapy and your selected approach might impact your practice as a PMHNP, or is missing.

Feedback:

·   Explain why humanistic-existential psychotherapy was utilized with the client in the video and why it was the treatment of choice.
·   Describe the expected potential outcome if the second approach had been used with the client.
·   Support your response with at least three peer-reviewed, evidence-based sources from the literature. PDFs are attached.–

Levels of Achievement:

Excellent
90%–100%
32 (32%) – 35 (35%)

The response includes a thorough and accurate explanation of why humanistic-existential psychotherapy was utilized with the client and why it was the treatment of choice.
The response includes a thorough and accurate description of the expected potential outcome had the second approach been used with the client.
The response is supported by at least three peer-reviewed, evidence-based sources from the literature that provide strong support for the rationale provided. PDFs are attached.

Good
80%–89%
28 (28%) – 31 (31%)

The response includes an accurate explanation of why humanistic-existential psychotherapy was utilized with the client and why it was the treatment of choice.

The response includes a description of the expected potential outcome had the second approach been used with the client.

The response is supported by three peer-reviewed, evidence-based sources from the literature that provide appropriate support for the rationale provided. PDFs are attached.

Fair
70%–79%
24 (24%) – 27 (27%)

The response includes a somewhat vague or incomplete explanation of why humanistic-existential psychotherapy was utilized with the client and why it was the treatment of choice.

The response includes a somewhat vague or incomplete description of the expected potential outcome had the second approach been used with the client.

The response is supported by two or three peer-reviewed, evidence-based sources from the literature. Resources selected may provide only weak support for the rationale provided. PDFs may not be attached.

Poor
0%–69%
0 (0%) – 23 (23%)

The response includes a vague and inaccurate explanation of why humanistic-existential psychotherapy was utilized with the client and why it was the treatment of choice, or is missing.

The response includes a vauge and incomplete description of the expected potential outcome had the second approach been used with the client, or is missing.

The response is supported by vague or inaccurate evidence from the literature, or is missing.

Feedback:

Written Expression and Formatting – Paragraph Development and Organization:
Paragraphs make clear points that support well-developed ideas, flow logically, and demonstrate continuity of ideas. Sentences are carefully focused—neither long and rambling nor short and lacking substance. A clear and comprehensive purpose statement and introduction is provided which delineates all required criteria.–

Levels of Achievement:

Excellent
90%–100%
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)

Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity.
A clear and comprehensive purpose statement, introduction, and conclusion are provided that delineates all required criteria.

Good
80%–89%
4 (4%) – 4 (4%)

Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity 80% of the time.

Purpose, introduction, and conclusion of the assignment are stated, yet are brief and not descriptive.

Fair
70%–79%
3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)

Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity 60%–79% of the time.

Purpose, introduction, and conclusion of the assignment are vague or off topic.

Poor
0%–69%
0 (0%) – 3 (3%)

Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity < 60% of the time. No purpose statement, introduction, or conclusion were provided. Feedback:

Written Expression and Formatting – English writing standards:
Correct grammar, mechanics, and proper punctuation–

Levels of Achievement:

Excellent
90%–100%
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)

Uses correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation with no errors.

Good
80%–89%
4 (4%) – 4 (4%)

Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity 80% of the time.

Purpose, introduction, and conclusion of the assignment are stated, yet are brief and not descriptive.

Fair
70%–79%
3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)

Contains 3 or 4 grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors.

Poor
0%–69%
0 (0%) – 3 (3%)

Contains many (≥ 5) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors that interfere with the reader’s understanding.

Feedback:

Written Expression and Formatting – The paper follows correct APA format for title page, headings, font, spacing, margins, indentations, page numbers, parenthetical/in-text citations, and reference list.–

Levels of Achievement:

Excellent
90%–100%
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)

Uses correct APA format with no errors.

Good
80%–89%
4 (4%) – 4 (4%)

Contains 1 or 2 APA format errors.

Fair
70%–79%
3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)

Contains 3 or 4 APA format errors.

Poor
0%–69%
0 (0%) – 3 (3%)

Contains many (≥ 5) APA format errors.

Feedback:

Total Points: 100

Name: NRNP_6645_Week7_Assignment_Rubric

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